Connect with us

Equipment

Ping Cadence TR Putters

Published

on

What if you could improve the consistency of your putting stroke just by changing the weight of your putter head?

That question led to the creation of Ping’s Cadence TR putters, which use two different inserts to allow golfers to choose between a standard or heavier version of the line’s seven different putter models.

The standard putters have blue, aluminum inserts, while the heavier putters have black, steel inserts that are between 25 and 33 grams heavier depending on the putter model.

e5014de4880bf92534519c8114b763ca

The idea came from what Ping calls the “average putting tempo,” a ratio of the amount of time it takes for golfers to make a backswing with their putter divided by the amount of time it takes them to make their forward swing, which is complete when the putter makes contact with the ball.

What Ping learned — with help from its iPing app, which has recorded the data of more than 7 million putts from golfers around the world — was that the ratio was mostly affected by golfers’ backswing times.

“Downswing times don’t change that much,” says Marty Jertson, Ping’s director of product development. “The variation tends to be in people’s backswing times.”

2a973b94fcc5e2249c5dcd6c44883ee0

According to Jertson, the average putting tempo is between 1.8 and 2.2, which accounts for roughly 35 percent of golfers.

Golfers on the lower end of the average or lower, which are usually those with quicker backstrokes, will likely putt better with lighter putters. Golfers on the higher end of the average or higher, which are usually those with slower backstrokes, will likely putt better with heavier putters – maybe even a counterbalanced putter.

On the fence between a standard, heavy or counterbalanced putter? Heavier putters tend to help golfers make more short putts, while lighter putters tend to improve distance control on longer putts, Jertson said.

bccbe7de72e0178a918d5af768738531

The Cadence TR putters also have Ping’s next-generation True Roll (TR) insert, which has variable width, variable depth grooves that improve energy transfer on putts hit across the putter face. That helps putts hit on the heel and toe of the putters roll close to the same distance as putts hit on the sweet spot.

The line includes three new models: a blade called the Anser W, a mallet called the Rustler and a mid-mallet, center-shafted putter called the Tomcat C. Learn more about those models, as well as the Anser 2, Anser 2 CB, B65 and Ketch putters below.

The putters are currently available for pre-order and will be in stores in mid-February. Adjustable-length models carry a $35 upcharge. 

Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Cadence TR putters in our forum.

Anser 2 ($185)

09d7f51be6945f6f565a67de59fddcf12d6e5039323f4de47325719c450849c62a973b94fcc5e2249c5dcd6c44883ee003b43a981fa8328326681c3ebbd44d2c

  • Head Weight: 340 grams (blue), 365 grams (black)
  • Stroke Type: Slight Arc

*The Anser 2 is also available in a counterbalanced, or CB model ($235). It has a head weight of 400 grams (blue), a length of 38 inches and has a 50-gram counterweight in its 17-inch grip. The stroke type is Slight Arc. 

Anser 2 W ($185)

24e200db0ac7e92210cc4b0e315362eed0a49027684b0d8be89cd559ef82c268a8d82559a1176fdab47e7b333c0100dbff337792b735a6accad19491147a89c1

  • Head Weight: 350 grams (blue), 375 grams (black)
  • Stroke Type: Slight Arc

B65 ($185)

e5014de4880bf92534519c8114b763ca15380aaffc364ab550834ce64d556d188410073a65e9eed9bb654dcee14d9c7ba5ce411698bb6c011f0585a93b31b1c0

  • Head Weight: 340 grams (blue), 365 grams (black)
  • Stroke Type: Straight

Ketsch ($245)

0eb70a8f1b14ed359fe3be58e906e9b25bb5c6fe9267a44df57b268e0252eb6b0a5d19b0c494ccdb3f424814522768be879fb1ac8412b2413929c970b0d10d26

The Ketsch has a milled face, not an insert. The putter’s head weight is adjusted with a 17-4 stainless steel sole weight.

  • Head Weight: 355 grams, 388 grams
  • Stroke Type: Straight, Slight Arc or Strong Arc (achieved with different shaft bends)

Rustler ($215)

b7fa577dcf565336ee49a05555f8a974cd483aa4ca3f4dcf13a9924e1cc26e630b428ff947d6d0b6f516ea357ca8c2c4e91001e1d220e487bb436355d551a34c

  • Head Weight: 350 grams (blue), 383 grams (black)
  • Stroke Type: Straight, Slight Arc or Strong Arc (achieved with different shaft bends)

Shea H ($185)

51062729187dd3311281232ca887a5753fc6e9daf2920cbd846082d7a02795efdb8a6371ee4eb5c6fad423ca717222eb0afdc3d2ca350f2e8e99867f6a20f6ba

  • Head Weight: 345 grams (blue), 378 grams (black)
  • Stroke Type: Strong Arc

Tomcat C ($185)

48ff7bd8b9c9ba06e85b179ac4cfd04d39156bee2b0860363181adee1ac65bba8b7abee19f8c49daa66cf5d3dc01407b6cf4e96cc155748d7cd4305b2003e19f

  • Head Weight: 355 grams (blue), 380 grams (black)
  • Stroke Type: Straight

Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Cadence TR putters in our forum.

Your Reaction?
  • 43
  • LEGIT49
  • WOW18
  • LOL3
  • IDHT3
  • FLOP3
  • OB5
  • SHANK4

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. gary u

    Jun 5, 2015 at 11:51 am

    I bought the Rustler for alignment purposes – sight line is great. The heavy version helps with putts inside 8-10′ since I am more a pendulum style putter. Basically I can take it back and then the heavy head starts back down the same line – otherwise let it swing “itself” toward the ball. On longer putts, took some practice but definitely improved my putting from inside 10′.

  2. CT

    Jan 12, 2015 at 1:36 pm

    I struggle to perceive how the normally weighted Cadence TR is different from the Scottsdale TR

  3. Marklar

    Jan 12, 2015 at 12:49 pm

    WHAT?!?! NO CB model on for the Ketsch?

  4. Ben

    Jan 12, 2015 at 12:07 pm

    No Zing or Anser 4 style is really disappointing.

  5. Jay

    Jan 12, 2015 at 11:41 am

    I’m a little disappointed with this release. I really like the TR tech, but this looks like the Scottsdale TR with a heavier head. Also, not a fan of the blue insert.

  6. Vytas Tarulis

    Jan 12, 2015 at 11:26 am

    What about the Tomcat C?

  7. Curt

    Jan 12, 2015 at 11:26 am

    I have been waiting for OEM’s to do this for quite some time. Using a whole roll of lead tape gets old………………..

  8. Jimmy s

    Jan 12, 2015 at 11:17 am

    Thats the updates ketch cant wait to try that one and the anser w i love my ” defective groove ” ketch now cant believe it could be made better.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Equipment

Tiger Woods opts for lead tape on his Newport 2 rather than a heavier putter: Here’s why it makes sense

Published

on

After days of speculation about which putter Tiger Woods might end up with an attempt to tame the greens at Royal Portrush, we now officially know he settled on his old faithful GSS Scotty Cameron but with a twist—some added lead tape.

The whole reason the speculation was in high gear early in the week was because of Tiger was spotted with a new custom Scotty that had the Studio Select weights in the sole to increase head weight to help with slow greens, something Tiger has talked about in the past—especially when it comes to the greens at The Open Championship.

We can even look back a few years ago when Tiger finally put a Nike putter in play, the original Method (those were nice putters) and talked about both the increased head weight and the grooves on the face to help get the ball rolling on slower greens.

The decision to stick with the old faithful with added lead tape goes beyond just a comfort level, even if the two putters look the same at address, it’s about feel and MOI around the axis.

Let me explain. Sure the putter heads weight the same, but depending on where the mass is located it will change the MOI. The putter with the Select weights vs. lead tape in the middle will have a higher MOI because there is more weight on the perimeter of the head—it’s like a blade vs. cavity back iron. Sure, two 7-irons can weigh the same but the performance will vary significantly.

For a player with such deft feel like Tiger Woods, any change like that can could cause doubt. Tweaking an already great putting stroke and on the eve of the last major of the year is not really something you want to do, which is why it isn’t surprising he stuck with his legendary Newport 2.

Lead tape in the middle allows Tiger to increase the head weight with very little change to the natural rate of rotation for hit putter and hopefully manage the slower Portrush greens better.

Your Reaction?
  • 14
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL3
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Your optimal wedge set-up?”

Published

on

Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from ClevelandKyle who brings up the subject of wedge set-ups. In the thread, our members discuss what wedges they like to carry as well as answering ClevelandKyle’s question: “If you had to carry two wedges for the rest of your life, what would they be (degree, make, model) and why?”

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • SEP1006: “PW / GW – 0311P PXG GEN 2, same as irons. 54/12 and 58/06 – Ping Glide Stealth 2.0: best wedges I’ve ever played by far, very versatile.”
  • cardoustie: “Like the OP, I keep going back to old school Vokey sm2’s .. 50/54/60. TVD m grinds. No wedge spins it as well or feels as good. I am ordering a Glide 3.0 eye 2 58 though.”
  • manoagolfer: “Vokey 48, 54, 58 and 62. Just added the 62 for the short stuff around the greens and steep faced bunkers.”
  • BCULAW: “RTX4 Raw 46 mid, 50 mid, 56 full, 60 low. After playing Vokeys almost exclusively for the last ten years or so, these Clevelands have been a real eye-opener. Spin is greatly increased, and the grind on the 60 is stellar. Highly recommended.”

Entire Thread: “Your optimal wedge set-up?”

Your Reaction?
  • 3
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “1 or 2-iron recommendations?”

Published

on

Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from Afor1991 who is on the hunt for a 1 or 2-iron after having no luck with hybrids. With a swing speed in the low 100s, Afor1991 is confident he has the speed and consistency to make a 1 or 2-iron work for him, and our members have been giving him their best suggestions in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • boggyman: “1st generation TM UDI 16* hard to beat with right shaft for a 1-iron, IF you could find one. Used mine in a set of OL Cobras for a while. Need to re-shaft it now though.”
  • Pepperturbo: “I have been effectively using T-MB 17* 2 iron since it was introduced. Now and again put my old Mizuno Pro 16* 1 iron in the bag to remind me those clubs require a good swing. Good luck with your choice.”
  • joelsim: “It depends on how much you value consistency over distance. And of course what your handicap is. I don’t have an official handicap but am regularly scoring in the 70s at my home club, at most 85 if I have a really bad day. And I tried a UDI #2 a couple of weeks ago and sold it a day later. Will stick to my G400 #4 Iron at power spec 19*. Gives me 195y carry consistently with run out according to ground hardness. So far it beats G and G400 Crossovers, Cobra King Utility and TM UDI #2 hands down.”
  • wam78: “Currently playing Mizuno mp h5 2 iron and I absolutely love it! Feels good, easy to hit high and low and can be found for a good price.”

Entire Thread: “1 or 2-iron recommendations?”

Your Reaction?
  • 2
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK5

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending