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Ping Glide Wedges

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Different golfers need different wedges, but they’re all searching for the same thing.

 “When you have a wedge that’s just right for you, it doesn’t dig and it doesn’t bounce,” says Marty Jertson, Ping’s director of product development. “It just glides through the turf.”

Ping has tweaked nearly every aspect of its new wedge line, aptly named “Glide.” Some changes, such as the improved grooves and sole grinds could be expected, while others take a more outside-the-box approach to help golfers improve their wedge games.

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An example? Hydrophobicity, the physical property of repelling water. Hydrophobic surfaces make water bead – think of Teflon-coated pans or windshields treated with Rain-X. Hydrophilic objects, such as paper, absorb water.

Ping studies found that chrome-plated wedges are more hydrophobic than wedges without chrome finishes, which means that they move more water away from the wedge face at impact. That improves consistency, and is why the Glide wedges have satin, chrome-plated finishes. According to Ping, the finish is 220 percent more consistent in wet grass and 35 percent more consistent in dry grass than the “dark blast” finish Ping used on its previous wedge line, the Tour Gorge.

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The Glide wedges are also cast from a 431 stainless steel that’s softer than the 17-4 stainless steel used on the Tour Gorge wedges. The softer metal, combined with Ping’s new elastomer Custom Tuning Port (CTP), creates a noticeably softer feel at impact.

The Glide wedges also have new grooves that are different in lower lofts than they are in higher lofts.

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The lower-lofted wedges (47, 50 and 52) have deeper grooves with 16-degree sidewalls that offer more consistency on full shots. The soles of the wedges were also given more bounce and made slightly wider compared to the Tour Gorge wedges, a change that will make the clubs easier to hit for most golfers.

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The higher lofted wedges (54, 56, 58 and 60) have shallower, wider grooves with 24-degree sidewalls. That gives them sharper edges to help golfers create more spin on open-face shots.

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The Glide wedges come in three different sole grinds that are considerably different, but there are a few commonalities. Compared to the Tour Gorge wedges, the new models have more bounce and more rounded leading edges to help them better glide through the turf. For improved versatility, they also have more heel relief and a steeper trailing edge.

Choosing the Right Grind

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Thin Sole (TS) wedges work best for golfers who have moderate-to-shallow angles of attack and/or those who play golf courses with firm conditions.

  • Lofts available: 58TS (20 degrees of bounce), 60TS (19 degrees of bounce)

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Wide Sole (WS) wedges are better for golfers who have moderate-to-steep angles of attack, and/or those who play golf courses with soft conditions.

  • Lofts available: 54WS (14 degrees of bounce), 56WS (14 degrees of bounce), 58WS (13 degrees of bounce), 60WS (13 degrees of bounce)


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Standard Sole (SS) wedges take the middle ground, and work for the widest range of golfers and course conditions. 

  • Lofts available: 47SS (12 degrees of bounce), 50SS (12 degrees of bounce), 52SS (12 degrees of bounce), 54SS (13 degrees of bounce), 56SS (13 degrees of bounce), 58SS (12 degrees of bounce), 60SS (12 degrees of bounce)

See more comparison photos of the grinds in the gallery below.

Shaft and Grip

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The Glide wedges have Ping’s new CFS wedge shafts, which use a single flex and 118-gram weight to deliver a low trajectory and stable feel.

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They also have Ping’s new Dylawedge grip, which is 0.75 inches longer than the company’s standard grip to encourage golfers to grip down on the club for more control. There are markings on the bottom of the grip at 1.375-inch intervals to create three reference points if golfers wish to use shaft length to alter trajectory and distance.

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At Address: Ping’s Gorge wedge (left) and new Glide wedge.

The grips have a larger outside diameter on their bottom half, which creates a more consistent feel regardless of where golfers position their hands on the grip.

“The great pitchers and chippers of the world grip down on the club around the green,” says Jertson. “It lightens the club up and gets the heel up in the air. When you give someone a longer grip, without telling them around the greens they’ll almost automatically do it.”

The shaft and grip changes further “lighten” the clubs. While the wedges have a slightly increased total weight of 13 grams, they have a lighter swing weight in the higher lofts. The Gorge wedges had a swing weight of D6 in the 58- and 60-degree models, while the Glide wedges have a stock swing weight that is a much more manageable D4.

Ping Glide Specs

Ping Glide Wedge Specs

Bubba Watson, who won the WGC-HSBC Champions in November with three Ping Glide wedges, uses a lob wedge with a swing weight of D1 to give him more control over delicate shots (click here to see all the clubs in Watson’s bag).

The Glide wedges ($140 steel, $160 graphite) are available for pre-order and will be in stores in mid February.

Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Glide wedges in our forum.

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31 Comments

  1. shabby

    Jun 3, 2015 at 12:58 am

    The sound is terrible and so is the feel. Worst wedge I have ever played and the shaft options are a joke! All ping club heads may be ok but none of the shafts are worth a shot o p!

  2. THONG

    Mar 7, 2015 at 4:42 pm

    I like them light but that’s me, I am thong!

  3. jj

    Mar 6, 2015 at 2:45 pm

    Well, I’m starting to loose faith in Ping. Turning what was once real innovation to just sales gimmicks. This 60* TS glide looks ok but seriously lacks performance in spin and distance. What is worse is the stock shaft weight is so light it’s ridiculous as is with an upgraded shaft. I put a KBS TOUR in at 120 grams and it still feels like nothing. I will have to go back to DG S-300 to see what’s up but at this time I am ZERO impressed by this wedge. Stay tuned.

  4. jj

    Feb 24, 2015 at 1:38 am

    I just bought a Ping 60 TS Glide wedge. First, my 60 is one of the most used in my bag and one of the most important in my scoring game. I have been through four 60* Gorge wedges and instead of a 5th I went for the Glide. I didn’t hit it in the practice bay, I can’t get a dam thing out of that with a wedge.

    On the range I instantly found that the club was minimal on feel. I also found that on full shots, getting even 90 yards was impossible. I usually max out at around 107+ w/ my 60*.

    For one, the club is WAY to light, at least for me. I never understand how Ping can offer only one shaft option and a 118 g at that. I guess high handicap’s may like it, but it’s just a dead feel with no feedback with the weak shaft.

    I usually install a DG S-300 .25 over and 1* to 1.5* flat in my wedges and that extra weight is perfect. Iron shafts have gotten lighter and I went to a KBS Tour V in my irons from a previous S-300 because of left elbow problems, they feel very good with the cushion insert. They are still a little light at 110 grams, 115 with the cushion but very happy with the feel.

    I returned the club at RD and ordered another direct from Ping with my preferred specs. I will know what’s really up when I get it back in a week or so.

  5. Zedsded

    Feb 17, 2015 at 11:59 am

    How do you know what bounce you need? When every manufacturer makes a 10* bounce yet none of them are similar, how do you know what you really have (or need)? Seems like it’s pretty easy to figure out this system…

    We look at bounce angles too much, cause bounce location has more to do with how a wedge feels/performs than the actual number. Numbers therefore are misleading. If you have a 10* bounce and the location is 3/4″ away from the lead edge vs. one that is 1/8″ away from the lead edge, those two wedges are going to play completely different, yet they are both 10* bounce? Archaic
    Two things that don’t happen enough…fitting for wedges and putters.

  6. B.Goodman

    Jan 31, 2015 at 3:37 pm

    How do they compare to the Ping Anser forged wedges?
    B.

  7. Jim

    Jan 16, 2015 at 12:04 am

    Any idea if Ping is going to offer customer stamping/engravings? Because that is a whole lot of blank surface on the back side of those wedges…

  8. RocketShankz

    Jan 14, 2015 at 11:00 pm

    It may seem a petty complaint, but I just don’t understand why they insist on making the bottom groove a different color. Less is more.

    • nick

      Jan 14, 2015 at 11:20 pm

      they do this for the lie and loft machine it reads the white bottom line. so i was told by ping

  9. JohnnyB

    Jan 14, 2015 at 5:23 pm

    Why is a D4 swingweight “more manageable” than D6? Why do most of the Ping staff pros carrying wedges with “less manageable” D6-D8 in the wedges?
    Same thing with Ping’s irons. The I25 comes stock with a D0 swingweight while most other manufacturers comparable products come with D2.

  10. Chip

    Jan 13, 2015 at 10:30 pm

    Some low bounce options would be nice….. PING seems to have never heard of them. Come on PING, I’ve been waiting for years!

  11. Gary

    Jan 13, 2015 at 11:12 am

    Looks like a pretty good over all improvement over the Tour Gorge. The lighter swing weight sounds good. Nice looking Satin finish and I like the over all design better than the Tour Gorge. Hopefully the new groove design will increase the spin around the greens. I am pretty well settled into the Mack Daddy 2 wedges but this one would be worth looking at probably.

  12. Shallowface

    Jan 13, 2015 at 7:35 am

    Karsten Solheim could have sold a lot more clubs in those early years if he had chrome plated them, but he didn’t believe it was necessary or beneficial. Of course, he was right.

    But now, his “descendants” claim it adds playability.

    Sheesh.

    I am familiar with the term Hydrophobic. I’ve sat next to him on the bus.

  13. Mike

    Jan 12, 2015 at 4:27 pm

    Does anyone on this site really believe they can tell the difference between 431 and 17-4 stainless steel when they hit a golf ball?
    I believe this is pure B.S.

    “The Glide wedges are also cast from a 431 stainless steel that’s softer than the 17-4 stainless steel used on the Tour Gorge wedges. The softer metal, combined with Ping’s new elastomer Custom Tuning Port (CTP), creates a noticeably softer feel at impact. “

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Jan 12, 2015 at 4:52 pm

      Yes, they’re less clicky.

      • Patrick

        Jan 12, 2015 at 11:01 pm

        Zak, Mike may have a point that you’re missing. I would be surprised to hear that Marty Jertsen said there would be a big sound difference due to the metal. What are you hearing these metals do? Is 431 being deformed more than 17-4 on a chip shot? Is it deforming the golf ball differently? I would be shocked if 431 vs. 17-4, cast vs. forged, 1020 vs. 1025 has a noticeable effect on sound. The design of the tuning port, club structure, cg location, point of impact, golf ball choice, your surroundings, and the amount of wax in your ears would probably have more impact on sound.

        • Patrick

          Jan 12, 2015 at 11:02 pm

          *Jertson. Sorry Marty.

        • Shallowface

          Jan 13, 2015 at 7:38 am

          The ability to engage in “Suspension of Disbelief” is a major quality one needs in order to be able to enjoy golf equipment, especially today.

          It’s the same quality that allows one to enjoy a movie. Or believe that Santa Claus or Professional Wrestling is real.

    • Mikec

      Jan 12, 2015 at 5:46 pm

      YOU CAN WHEN YOU PUT IT IN A LOFT LIE MACHINE — That accounts for a lot

  14. Myron miller

    Jan 12, 2015 at 4:26 pm

    One major issue for me. I like my 60 degree to have very low bounce. I play a lot of tight lies from the fairway and like to use my 60 when I’m less than 75 yards. having the low bounce makes it very easy. With only 13 degree bounce that’s an issue (in fact that’s higher than my 56 SW at 12 degrees).

    • M

      Jan 12, 2015 at 11:24 pm

      Myron – Just try the TS – it will play very similar to other low bounce options from the other manufacturers.

      Bounce numbers don’t tell the entire story as how the club will play.

  15. Mnmlist Golfr

    Jan 12, 2015 at 2:12 pm

    “Water on the clubface, bro…”

  16. Garbage

    Jan 12, 2015 at 2:07 pm

    Did they copy the grooves from Mizuno?

    • Gary

      Jan 13, 2015 at 11:03 am

      Seems like at least a couple companies (Callaway and Titleist for 2) liked the Mizuno idea of different groove designs for the higher lofts vs. the lower lofts to try to increase the spin on the higher lofts and not to have too much spin on the lower lofts.

  17. Jim

    Jan 12, 2015 at 12:26 pm

    Great looking wedges. Much improved over the Gorge wedges. Intriguing design with multiple bounces and groove patterns too. Not sure they’ll get me away from my Vokeys but if they’re as good as other Ping clubs they might be worth a try.

  18. Tom Noel

    Jan 12, 2015 at 12:15 pm

    Funny how much they look like a Gene Sarazen R-20?

  19. Tom Noel

    Jan 12, 2015 at 12:13 pm

    Funny how much they look like a Gene Sarazen R-20 Wedge?

  20. chuck stone

    Jan 12, 2015 at 11:46 am

    These pro line club prices are crazy. Its because the manufactures pay the pros too much to play them, may also be why golf is retracting..

  21. JEFF

    Jan 12, 2015 at 11:25 am

    GLIDE??? SERIOUSLY???? How bout monkey nuts? GEEEEESH!!!

    • bradford

      Jan 12, 2015 at 12:33 pm

      Focus groups didn’t respond well to monkey nuts.

    • Jimmy s

      Jan 12, 2015 at 4:17 pm

      Well they could have painted them white put sldrs on them slots too oh dont forget lofting up and then called them SANDBURNER . No seriously ping never really uses hip names its always something different and understated it seems but the reason most people play thier stuff is that it just works function over form who cares what the name is as long as they go where you aim them right they look good cant wait to see what they feel like i own the tour gorges i like them about as much as i liked my cg15’s they replaced. Hopefully they are sandburner-ier or something like that lol

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Optimal bag setup for a high handicapper?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from rkillian who has opened up a discussion on the optimal bag setup for high handicappers. Here’s a look at rkillian’s current set-up: 

“Driver 9 degree head turned up to 2 to 11 degrees. I get my most consistent ball flight and distance from this setting. The 9 gave me the best numbers that day in the store but up 2 degrees works much better for me on the course – Total average is about 270 set like this”

“HL 3 Wood at 16.5 Degrees – total average is 235 off the tee, but I have hit some into the 250s. But I can’t hit it off the deck whatsoever. I get lucky sometimes when I try and hit it off a mat at the range but never off actual turf.

3 Hybrid 19 degrees – a well-struck shot will go nearly that same distance as my 3 wood maybe 220. But a well-struck shot with this club is the anomaly here.

4 Hybrid 22 degrees – I can hit this club pretty consistently 200 yards plus if I don’t chunk it and up to 220 total or more on the right hole from a tee.

5i-PW at 45 Degrees – I don’t hit my 5 iron consistently, but I am “ok” with my irons. My 8 iron is my 150-yard club when well struck.

Gw at 52 – This almost never gets used. It is about a 110-yard full swing, and I have found that I am never really at that yardage.

Sw at 56 – about 90-95 yards on a full swing but it can balloon on my and fall short. I am finding I don’t use it on full swings often though. Pretty much use it 80 yards and in.

and of course the 3-putt machine.”

Our members have been sharing their thoughts in our forums, with a range of interesting ideas suggested.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • jvincent: “You don’t talk about how long the various clubs are or what shafts are in them, so this is somewhat a guess based on what you have said above. Definitely drop the 3W in favour of a 4W or 5W. Since it looks like the driver is working for you, try to get the same model of shaft, but in a heavier version. Make sure that the length of the fairway wood you end up with is no longer than 42.5″. I’d recommend 42″. You don’t say if the current hybrids are the same brand or not, but if not, try to get a 3 that matches your 4. Again, shaft weight and length are important. A long hybrid that you can’t hit aren’t any good to you. I’d keep the 5i. I would add back the 52* wedge. At your skill level, not having to manufacture a partial swing is going to be better in the long run. Again, if it doesn’t match your irons at least try to get the same shaft weight and make sure it is the correct length.”
  • ChipNRun: “Two main observations: FW Shaft. Your 3W/HL may have a common problem with TaylorMade FWs: the shaft is too long. The 3W/HL has the same shaft length as a 3W, not a 4W. If you trimmed shaft back to 42.5″, this might help get you the better control of a 4W. (assuming swing weight does not get too light – you could have fitter tip-weight it if it feels too feathery.) Work with a fitter to see if a shorter shaft might help. Lessons!! Since you shoot about 96, you need to tweak your golf swing before you tweak your bag mix. Get a swing tune-up lesson, and see if the pro can figure out adjustments you can make to hit the ball better. A lesson or two can take you farther in a month than you can get on your own in a full season. It appears you are stuck in the mud: find a pro who can help pull you out. Then, practice what the pro tells you – and play some holes if weather permits – before your next lesson.”
  • mkuether: “Very interesting topic! Like many others who have already posted, I think we have a lot in common. My distances are very similar to yours, and your scores are similar to where I was about ten years ago. I also struggled with my longer irons, hybrids, and especially fairway woods. The good news is that I was able to find a set that worked for me and improve significantly. I am sure you can do the same. First, the #1 thing that has helped me has been to simply get clubs I was comfortable with. It took me a while to find a hybrid that really suited me, but once I did, it made a huge difference in my confidence. I ended up dropping my 5-wood entirely because I was just never confident with it, but a 19-degree hybrid was much better (for me). I also stopped trying to hit a 3-wood off the deck (I was terrible at it) and reserved it for the occasional shot off the tee where I felt driver was too much. My 3-wood doesn’t get a lot of use since in my case I’m simply more confident with my 460cc driver, and I can usually throttle back and hit that shorter when needed. Anyway, I’m not sure why I’m so much more confident with my hybrids now (who knows, maybe they just suit my eye), but the confidence really helps. I also avoid playing clubs with longer than average shafts (e.g. my driver is 44.5″) and I find that really helps my confidence and consistency. If you’re already having trouble with fairway woods, longer shafts are only going to make it worse. I would also try and learn to hit your shorter irons as distance clubs on full swings, that has helped me a lot too. Knowing that I have a consistent, full-swing shot that I can hit a consistent distance (or pretty close) down to about 80 yards has definitely helped my scores. You seem to play an incredibly short course for your overall distance so I can’t imagine that you’re getting that much use out of your longer clubs anyway. Just curious, do you enjoy playing a course that short? I find it more fun to play a slightly longer course where I have a variety of shorts in the greens, seems like you would be hitting driver/wedge on every hole unless you’re teeing off with shorter clubs on purpose. In any case, a golfer of your skill level (or mine) is going to be missing the green on most approaches with a wood or hybrid, so it probably makes more sense to work on optimizing the bottom half of your bag since you’ll need to get up and down a lot. Anyway, good luck improving. I’m sure a little experimentation with different clubs will go a long way towards feeling more confident and playing better.”
  • CapnSwagga: “I don’t write much here I’m not a writer its easy to have something profound to say but to be able to eloquently write it I have not these skills, but I’ll try to make my point, I myself played the same game constantly trapped in trying to figure out what equipment was for me. A close friend and golf professional helped me tremendously after a few rounds, and it wasn’t any advice on my swing or what my equipment should be it was simply: stop. Stop thinking, stop worrying, stop analyzing (although it is very important to analyze post swing). We get a wrapped up in the idea of what’s supposed to be right or work or what we see on TV and in reality the one simple principle “hit the ball” gets shrouded over. People will go on and on who makes the best clubs or ball or what shaft is going to work the best for you, but any golfer could pick up any piece of crap and knock it out there…off grass, turf, mats, tees or even a strippers **** it’s the confidence to do what is required without any additional thought. I don’t disagree with suggestions others made above and gapping your bag is also very vital, so I’m sorry if my comment goes slightly off your topic I think having a solid practice regime and dedication are truly the tools to become better at golf. Thanks for the read.”

Entire Thread: “Optimal bag set-up for a high handicapper?”

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19th Hole

Puma reveal the patriotic golf shoes Rickie Fowler, Gary Woodland, Bryson DeChambeau and Ernie Els will be wearing at the 2019 Presidents Cup

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Puma Golf has unveiled what its brand ambassadors, Rickie Fowler, Gary Woodland and Bryson DeChambeau will be wearing this week at the Presidents Cup, as well as the shoes the International Captain, Ernie Els, will be sporting at Royal Melbourne.

Woodland and DeChambeau will both don the brand’s new patriotic Pwradapt Star-Spangled shoes which feature an Old Glory inspired red, white and blue colorway incorporating stars and stripes throughout the design.

Puma Presidents Cup PWRADAPT Star Spangled

Puma Presidents Cup PWRADAPT Star Spangled

The shoes also contain a full-length Ignite foam midsole, designed to provide unparalleled comfort and energy return, and are available to purchase at PumaGolf.com and at retail.

Puma Presidents Cup PWRADAPT Star Spangled

Fowler will be debuting an exclusive-to-him, custom pair of Proadapts, which as you might expect, also showcase a red white and blue colorway.

Puma Rickie Fowler Presidents Cup PROADAPTS

Puma Rickie Fowler Presidents Cup PROADAPTS

For The Big Easy, Els will strut the grounds of Royal Melbourne as captain of the International side in Puma’s new limited-edition Ignite Nxt Presidents Cup shoes. The new additions feature design elements from the new International team logo, with a mostly black upper accented with gold hits, while a gold speckled midsole represents the gold trophy.

Puma Presidents Cup IGNITE NXT Presidents Cup

Puma Presidents Cup IGNITE NXT Presidents Cup

The Ignite Nxt Presidents Cup shoes also feature the International team logo on the tongue pull tabs, the outsole, and sockliner, while Els’ signature logo can be seen on the heel pull tab and inside of the tongue pull tab. These shoes are available to purchase now at PumaGolf.com and at retail.

Puma Presidents Cup IGNITE NXT Presidents Cup

Puma Presidents Cup IGNITE NXT Presidents Cup

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2020 Wilson Golf Launch Pad woods, fairway woods, irons

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Wilson Staff has been helping golfers improve for more than 100 years, and they are going to be helping more golfers in 2020 with the introduction of the Launch Pad Family of woods and irons, along with a reimagining of an old favorite from the Wilson brand—the FY Club.

3, 2, 1 liftoff!

As much as we love watching professional golfers mash drivers and stop long irons like wedges, more than 80 percent of golfers in “the real world” will never break 100, but if you are in that category, Wilson Staff is here to help with the Launch Pad family. If the name gives anything away about the new Launch Pad series from Wilson Staff, it’s that they are meant to get up, and quickly! The entire line from the driver to the irons are targeted at the majority of regular golfers (10-plus handicaps) that struggle with creating height and gaining extra distance.

The idea behind helping golfers gain speed, height, and distance isn’t new, in fact it’s what most equipment companies are trying to achieve with each and every release—the reason being that most golfers still need help. If you don’t think that’s true because of the people you generally play golf with, go to a public driving range on a nice sunny day in July, and you’ll soon see that most golfers should probably try a set of clubs like this.

Here’s where Wilson gets is right when many don’t. New technology isn’t useful if A) it’s not affordable to the target market B) it’s not appealing to the eye. The Launch Pad series was designed from the top down to inspire confidence for higher handicap golfers by incorporating technologies that both work and are visually subtle. All of  these features together deliver the best possible shot-helping performance for the super game-improvement player.

2020 Wilson Launch Pad Driver and Fairway Woods

Say what you want about your own game, but most golfers really do struggle with trying to fix a slice.
The new Launch Pad Driver takes a modern approach to helping golfers by offering a discrete amount of offset hidden in the hosel of the club, 13 grams of mass positioned closer to the hosel near the heel to help with rate of rotation (closing the clubface), and, finally, a more upright lie angle. The lie angle is one of the biggest helpers since, just like with an iron, lie angle is one of the biggest contributors to initial launch direction (a launch monitor parameter): the more left you you start the ball, the less likely that ball can go right.

Another thing to note about the Wilson Launch Pad Driver is that at only 272 grams, it’s one of the lightest drivers on the market, regardless of price point. Lighter total weight translates into the opportunity for golfers to increase clubhead speed. Here’s the funny thing about clubhead speed: the more you have, the further the ball goes—physics!

The last piece of the Launch Pad driver puzzle is the new Variable Face Technology, which helps keep ball speeds higher on mishits. Just like with hitting a slice, every once in a while, you just might miss the sweet spot too.

The Launch Pad fairway woods, like the driver, are designed with a small amount of hosel offset and heel weighting to help golfers gain control and hit higher, straighter shots more often. The face of the Launch Pad fairway woods is built with a 455 carpenter stainless steel insert to make it thinner while retaining strength. This thinner hot face, increases feel and distance for the fairway woods, all while keeping a similar shape profile that carries from the driver.

Wilson Launch Pad Irons

Billy Joel said it best with the song “All about Sole”…or maybe it was soul? I’m not quite sure, but either way.  The most impactful design element of the new Launch Pad irons from Wilson is the Launch Pad Sole that runs throughout the entire set.

This sole is designed to hopefully eliminate “chunked” from the golfer’s vocabulary, while also helping improve launch at the same time. The short irons of the set feature traditional game-improvement-style widths that smoothly transition into wider, more forgiving soles as you go up in the set towards the longer irons. This wider deeper sole pushes mass lower in the head and further away from the face. This pushing of mass lower makes the ball go higher—physics, again!

There is one more thing about this sole that is it vital to its performance: increased bounce and camber. The Launch Pad irons have more bounce and a smooth camber from the leading to the trailing edge to help keep the leading edge above the dirt longer and help prevent the club from digging. The effectiveness of the bounce can be seen in the address position in how it keeps the leading edge up and helps “float” the face.

Like the Launch Pad woods, the irons are lightweight, which makes it easier to generate faster clubhead speed leading to longer higher flying shots. The irons also come stock with midsize grips to provide comfort and enhanced feel for greater confidence with every swing.

The FY Club

If the Wilson Staff FY Club sounds familiar, it should. Wilson introduced the original FY(brid) in the 2007/08 during the i7 era (Pi7, Ci7, Di7) as a middle club between a fairway wood and a hybrid. Technology has come along way since 2007, but just like with the classic Wilson R90 wedge, the Launch Pad FY Club proves that a good idea has staying power.

Wilson Labs testing showed a club with a 41” shaft matched with 19.5° of loft was the easiest-to-hit combination of loft and length for golfers that hold a handicap over 10, when looking at average swing speeds in the category, a single FY Club replaced the need for 3-irons, 3-hybrids and 7-woods all at the same time.

The FY club fits into a BIG problem spot for most golfers between the shortest fairway wood and the longest iron and helps reduce shot dispersion. Just like the fairway woods, the FY Club technology is face focused with the Carpenter Custom 455 Stainless Steel face insert to create ball speed.

“The process of creating the Launch Pad Driver, Fairway Woods and FY Club started with researching the swings of self-described slicers,” said Jon Pergande, Global Innovation Manager at Wilson Golf.

“Our goal is to help players stay in play more often than not and the visually subtle technologies in our Launch Pad Driver and Woods like the offset hosel and weight in the heel have done just that.”

Wilson Launch Pad Family: Specs and Availability

DRIVER

The Launch Pad Driver is available in both men’s and women’s options for only $299.99. It comes stock with the new UST-Mamiya Helium Series, and the Wilson Staff MicroLite Lamkin grip, which maintains the traditional feel in a super lightweight construction.

FAIRWAY WOODS

The Launch Pad Fairway Woods will be sold for $199.99 and are available in two loft options in both right and left-handed (15 and 18 degrees) with the same UST-Mamiya Helium Series shaft and Wilson Staff MicroLite Lamkin grip used on the driver.

The fairway woods will also be available as women’s clubs at a price of $199.99. The Launch Pad Fairway Woods for women will be available in two loft options (16 and 19 degrees) with the UST-Mamiya Helium Series shaft and Wilson Staff MicroLite Lamkin grip used on the Launch Pad Driver.

IRONS

The Launch Pad Irons will be offered with a lightweight KBS Tour 80 steel shaft or UST-Mamiya Recoil 460 graphite shaft, with both options featuring the traditional Wilson Staff 2 Crossline Midsized grip. The steel set is $699.99 while the graphite set starts at $799.99.

FY Club

The Launch Pad FY Club is available for $179.99 in right and left-hand options at 19.5-degree loft with the UST-Mamiya shaft and Wilson Staff Microlite grip. The FY Club will also be available for women in a RH option with 20.5-degree loft.

The entire Launch Pad family will be available for pre-order on Wilson.com starting December 17th and will be available at retail on Monday, January 13th.

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