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Mizuno Performance Fitting System

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By Rob Miller

GolfWRX Staff

In golf, the name Mizuno is synonymous with great irons.  Chances are we all know a player – and probably a good one – that gamed ‘Mizzys’ growing up and hasn’t switched iron brands since.  Great feel combined with classic good looks is hard to beat.  Over the years, Mizuno expanded their lineup to include models for golfers of all skill levels while still staying true to its roots of function, clean looks and mostly ‘grain flow’ forgings.  Through the years, Mizuno irons have been consistent Gold and Silver winners on Golf Digest’s annual Hot List.

Of course, when you have many different iron models to chose from, you need to properly fit golfer to club and shaft — not necessarily an easy task.  Mizuno created their Performance Fitting System to help us out. GolfWRX is working with Mizuno to fit some of our equipment reviewers into the proper iron/shaft combo.  I recently was invited to see what it was all about.

I have been through a few fittings before, but never the Mizuno Performance Fitting System.   The claim is “In just a few swings, Mizuno’s Shaft Optimizer ends the guesswork by measuring five critical aspects of your swing to determine your unique Swing DNA. “  Having tried it out, I have to say it works great.

Your information is entered into Mizuno’s patented Shaft Optimizer software, which then recommends a shaft with performance characteristics perfectly matched to your individual swing.

I took about a dozen swings, but honestly as little as three is all it really took. My numbers came up and created my own swing signature which measured:

  • Club Head Speed: How fast the club head and shaft are moving during your swing.
  • Tempo: How quickly you transition from your backswing to your downswing.
  • Shaft Toe Down: Measures how far the shaft bends in a downward direction during your downswing.
  • Shaft Kick Angle: Measures how far the shaft bends forward during your downswing.
  • Release Factor: How and when the club head and shaft are released during the downswing

The kicker is the Shaft Optimizer is it does not care about the quality of your strike of the ball.  Good contact or bad, you have a swing signature and its job is to find it.

Once the data was input by my fitter, the system gave me a few shaft suggestions, including Dynalite Gold XP and Project X 5.0.

With the Shaft Optimizer portion done, it was time to decide on clubhead / shaft combo by hitting balls at the range.  I alternated between MP-59 and JPX-800 Pro heads with Project X and Dynalite. Ultimately, deciding on JPX-800 Pros with Dynalite XP S300.  This choice is up to you.   Next half-dozen hits off a lie board confirmed 2 degrees upright.

The length of the process varies depending on how many balls you want to hit.  Being a range rat, I took my time, but you could be done easily in under an hour.

So here’s the best part.  Your Mizuno fitter inputs your order directly into the system.  Would you rather bag an MP-R12 50* rather than your set’s Gap Wedge?  You can swap out wedges on the order screen.  Rather play a Fli-Hi than your 4 iron?  Done.  Want a mixed set of 800 Pros and MP-59s?  Mizuno can do that too (I was tempted). It’s all customizable.

Finally, Mizuno has perhaps the best turnaround in the industry.  Orders are submitted by the rep on the spot and you’ll be bagging your new Mizunos within  7-10 days.  In my case, it was seven on the nose.  Mizuno touts this as ‘the best turnaround in the industry’.

So, how are the irons, you ask? (After all, the proof is in the pudding). Happy to say I entered new territory with my Mizunos.  I shot my best score ever, 2-over par for an 18 hole round, just the third time I put them in play.

In the market for new irons?  With iron models made for every type of golfer, you can perhaps find your perfect set of Mizunos–  and go from custom fitting to the course in about seven days.

Look for Mizuno Iron reviews from GolfWRX very soon.

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Rob is a golf junkie that has been involved with GolfWRX since its inception in 2005. From designing headcovers, to creating logos to authoring articles to social media management to sales and marketing, Rob has done it all. Born and bred in NJ. Favorite golfers: Phil, Freddie. Favorite club: Driver.

5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. tony

    Aug 15, 2014 at 10:19 pm

    I had the same results and have played both the dg s300 and dnlite s300s. I do get a tiny bit more airtime with the lights but ive always used the dg s300s so thats probably why i fit them honestly.

    this is real fitting here, just like the pros.

  2. Pingback: Custom Fitting by Mizuno | Help and Aid Businesses

  3. Andrew Adamonis

    May 21, 2012 at 11:30 am

    This whole concept is based on the old True Temper Shaft Lab loading device. It is the real deal. It can work with woods to with a proper fitter.

  4. Anthony

    May 20, 2012 at 4:31 am

    I actually just went to a fitting today. I must say I was impressed by the shaft optimizer. HOWEVER, i feel as a higher handicap that its not something i would take true to heart. To be honest this wasn’t my first fitting with Mizuno. I am a Mizuno nut btw. Anyhow fitting 1 told me to go with standard dynamic gold shafts stiff. Second fitting told me to go with dynamic XP extra stiff. ???? i was confused. I honestly feel that for someone who may not have their swing down consistently it may be a waste of time to get fitted clubs and when you change your swing you have to change to another. Comments thoughts?

    • MJ

      Nov 8, 2012 at 8:55 pm

      Hmm.. In fact, DG stiff and Dynalite (not “dynamic” btw) XP extra stiff are pretty similar in flight and spin except DG stiff might be slightly heavier.

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Equipment

WRX Spotted: New TaylorMade P790 UDI

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It’s Open Championship week and that means course conditions are the talk of the town. Firm, fast, and windy conditions are expected on the links of Portrush, so we will be seeing a lot of players using driving irons that they might not otherwise play with week to week on the PGA Tour.

Not only are driving irons a hot item for players, but for OEMs launching new and prototype versions including TaylorMade, which has a new P790 UDI in some bags including Mr. Tiger Woods (credit to Rob Brooks on Instagram for the spot).

Like with many clubs just being seeded to tour, we don’t have official comment from the team at TaylorMade…but, like many times before, we have a couple of ideas based off the cosmetics of what might be in store if and when this thing comes to retail.

Some history: It’s been a while since TaylorMade introduced a new UDI (Ultimate Driving Iron) to its lineup.  There was the GAPR Low, which was very UDI “like” but the UDI as a whole never had an adjustable hosel. (There were Tour Issue versions of the GAPR Lo that had a fixed hosel and no adjustability)

The original (2017) P790 UDI

The “just-spotted 2020 (?)” version

The most recent UDI was the original P-790, but this new version has some distinct differences

  • Thinner sole. Based off the pictures, this new P-790 UDI has a thinner sole with more camber to help improve turf interaction. More camber and well-utilized bounce make any club more playable in varying conditions.
  • Shorter blade length. There is no such thing as computer screen calipers but from what we can tell when comparing side by side the new version is shorter. A shorter blade length means a CG closer to the hosel and more workability.
  • Higher toe. Just like the shorter blade length, a higher toe is often more appealing to more players (better players are generally the target for these types of clubs) and what that also “potentially” does is raise the CG. A higher CG will produce lower launching shots BUT with more spin (workability). To counter act the potential extra spin loft adjustments can be made pretty easily, since loft is one of the biggest factors in creating spin.

The one thing that is harder to compared is whats going on inside of this UDI (obviously). There is a screw in the toe, so it can be assumed that there is some sort of foam or material that helps support the face and improve the acoustics of this face thin-faced iron.

Just like we wait for the first group off early Thursday morning at Portrush, we’re just going to have to wait to see what’s really going on this new UDI too.

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Tiger Woods with a new Scotty Cameron at The Open”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from No Gimmes who was quick to spot Tiger Woods preparing for this week’s Open Championship with a new Scotty putter. Woods has also been seen warming up for this week’s event at Royal Portrush with his old faithful on the greens, but our members have been discussing the thinking behind the 15-time-major champion’s potential change, as well as the putter itself.

*Photos from Golf Central’s ‘Live From The Open’ coverage

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • TheMoneyShot: “I’m really surprised he is making the switch. Let’s see if it’s in the bag come Thursday.”
  • Hedgehog: “That topline and the alignment aid and all the smooth lines, gorgeous!”
  • MuniPukeLife: “Makes sense as his trusty NP2 is super light by today’s putter standards.”

Entire Thread: “Tiger Woods with a new Scotty Cameron at The Open”

 

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Mizuno T20 wedges: Let’s get spinning

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Spin.

We’re always trying to reduce it with our driver and increase it with our wedges for maximum control, but with the rules of golf being so strict, how do actually achieve a performance gain? Simple engineering…

This is the Mizuno T20 wedge.

It’s been a few years since we have seen a T (teardrop) wedge from our friends at Mizuno, and there is good reason.

Let’ get into a quick history lesson: before the JPX900 series was introduced, Mizuno had quietly been realigning the product cycles of the MP and JPX lines. You might remember back a few years ago now before the MP18s hit the scene that there was a bit of a lull in the MP line—so much, in fact, there was even a thread here on GolfWRX asking “Is Mizuno not making MP irons anymore?”

It was a naturally curious question to a company that always had very standardized release cycles, but it was a long-term play that has paid off tremendously. We now get “T” wedges with MP irons (MP20s to be exact), and we should (from everything I know) continue to see “S” Silhouette (more rounded profile) wedges with future JPX lines.

Before we get to what’s new, how about we first talk about what will be staying the same

  • Grain Flow Forged HD – like all new Mizuno irons, the T20s are made using the same forging process to increase the density of the material in the clubhead for an improved solid feel.
  • Boron – this little element when added to the 1025e mild carbon steel used in the wedges (we’re talking trace amounts equating to 3ppm – parts per million) increases the strength of the material by 30 percent—how crazy is that for chemistry? This improves groove life and has ZERO effect on club feel.
  • Variable Width & Depth Quad Cut Grooves – Like previous T and S wedges, the T20s will have quad cut grooves that will vary in shape based on the loft of the club. Lower lofted wedges are more narrow and deeper, while higher lofted wedges are wider and more shallow since impact happens at lower speeds this increases spin consistency.
  • Same beautiful Teardrop profile from address

So what’s new?

Flow. Just like the MP20s, engineers are bringing more a more extreme CG (center of gravity) shifting philosophy, or as Mizuno explains it, increased vertical moment of inertia to the wedges. As much as you (well maybe not “you,” depending on who you are) might think “a wedge is just a wedge” and loft is the only deciding factor for spin, you couldn’t be further from the truth. By relocating the CG throughout the set and changing the sweet spot height, engineers can further alter the launch and spin precisely for each loft.

It’s about gear effect—the higher you hit above the CG the less spin the ball with have, and the closer to or lower you make impact compared to the CG the more spin you will create. Either way these are wedges, so a 50 degree, for example, is still going to spin, but it is now more controllable (think less likely to ballon or get too high on full shots). On the other side of the equation, a 60-degree wedge will allow for even MORE trajectory and spin control for the low flying quick checkers with zip.

Now about that spin.

By the Rules of Golf, you can’t make grooves sharper, you can’t increase their volume, and you can only have so much surface roughness (sorry but that old Spin Doctor wedge is HIGHLY NON-conforming). So what do you do? You change the way you think about that surface roughness…

Hydroflow Micro Grooves

Instead of traditional laser etching parallel to the grooves, Mizuno engineers took a concept from the high-performance tire world and went perpendicular to the grooves and parallel to the direction the ball moves up the face to channel moisture away. This directional tread has proven to increase spin on shots especially in conditions with moisture up to 1,200 RPM (on a 60-yard shot), that’s a very tangible number. It’s not just about spin either: the more the friction that can be created also means more control on launch angle and less of a “floating” ball flight. That’s how those low zippers keep zippin’!

Don’t think for a second that Mizuno just changed the etching and was done with it. The process went through multiple iterations to figure out how they could improve its life (beyond the boron) and the solution was to etch before the chroming process to elongate the lifespan. The other groovy take for the T20s is the actual reconfiguration of the grooves. To get the bottom groove closer to the leading edge without having it disorient the overall look of the club and making it appear that the heel or toe is thinner on one side. The lowest groove has been shortened and centered.

All of these refinements; CG, micro-grooves, and reconfigured scoring lines add up to one thing: more control and improved shotmaking with your wedges.

Finishes, specs, and grinds

The wishes of many have been answered when it comes to the T20s, there will be a RAW finish (happy dance time) along with traditional chrome and the signature blue ion. Leftys will only be able to get chrome, but all the same options will be available as far as lofts and grinds.

Coming in lofts from 46-60 degrees, the grind options progress depending on the loft and bounce. Going from full-soled in the lower lofts to more aggressive back edge, and heel-toe relief in the 60 degree. These sole shapes came directly from Mizuno’s craftsman that worked with players and prototypes to determine exactly how the bounce and sole shapes should work in harmony.

All of this has come together to create Mizuno’s finest wedge to date.

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