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Callaway Big Bertha Irons and Hybrids

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In the last two years, Callaway Golf has seen its U.S. dollar share in golf equipment sales — that is the amount of money consumers spend on Callaway’s clubs versus other companies’ clubs — grow 37 percent.

The company’s growth points to several factors, such as the strong play of Callaway Staff members and the revival of iconic golf clubs names such as Big Bertha and Apex. Inside company headquarters, however, there seems to be one key development that sounds through the halls of its R&D department, its marketing team and even CEO Chip Brewer. It’s the face cup technology that debuted on Callaway’s 2013 X Hot line of fairway woods.

Remember when Phil Mickelson used Callaway’s X Hot 3Deep fairway wood as his driver in route to winning the Scottish Open and Open Championship in back-to-back weeks? The extra distance he was getting from his 3 wood was thanks to a face cup.

Last year, Callaway added face cups to its X2 Hot and X2 Hot Pro hybrids to much fanfare and a perfect showing in our 2014 Gear Trials: Best Hybrids list. And now, for the first time, face cups will make an appearance in a Callaway iron: the 2015 Big Bertha.

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The debut of face cup technology in the new Big Bertha irons comes with a bold claim of more distance. Just how much more? According to Callaway, the Big Bertha irons will be up to two clubs longer for certain golfers.

Note: Callaway’s distance claim is based on head-to-head testing against its 2011 RAZR X HL irons. 

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Let’s be clear: not every type of golfer is going to see game-changing distance from the new irons, nor will every golfer want it. Many better players will hit the Big Bertha irons too high, struggle to work they ball with them and they probably won’t enjoy their appearance at address, either. They’re larger than the company’s current Apex and X2 Hot irons, with wide soles, generous blade lengths and quite a bit of offset.

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A Big Bertha 5 iron at address

Scott Manwaring, Callaway’s director of design, put it this way:

[quote_box_center]“[The Big Bertha irons] are for center-of-the-green players. They’re past aiming for pins and they’re not necessarily working on their game.”[/quote_box_center]

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One of the easiest ways for golfers to hit more greens is to hit a shorter club into those greens, which is why the Big Bertha irons were designed with two parts. The first part is a lightweight face cup that’s made to be as hot as possible. Those faces are welded to the second part: stainless steel bodies that move weight low in the head for a higher launch. Both the club heads and faces are cast from 17-4 stainless steel.

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So what creates all the distance? The face cups, of course. Their construction allows for extremely deep undercuts that sit behind the bottom of the club faces and act as hinges at impact. The more these hinges bend, Manwaring said, the more ball speed can be created, which is why the hinges are shaped to create as much bending as possible. The theory is similar to the one that has companies putting slots in its metal woods and irons for more distance, although Manwaring believes the benefits of face cups outweigh those of slots.

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The Big Bertha irons ($999 steel, $1099 graphite) are available in 4-PW, AW and SW, although most golfers who are a fit for the clubs might want to skip the long irons. For them, Callaway has designed Big Bertha hybrids, which are adjustable to help golfers fill the distance gaps the long-flying irons are sure to create. The hybrids use the same Opti-Fit hosels as the company’s Big Bertha drivers, giving them a 3-degree range of loft adjustability and two independent lie angle settings: neutral and upright.

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The Big Bertha hybrids also have the same 455 Carpenter Steel Hyper Speed Face Cups as Callaway’s X2 Hot hybrids, although they have a larger, more fairway-wood like shape than those hybrids. That makes them more forgiving and slightly higher spinning.

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They’re available in the following models: 3H (19 degrees), 4H (22 degrees), 5H (25 degrees), 6H (28 degrees) and 7H (31 degrees). By themselves, the hybrids sell for $249 each, but golfers can create an 8-piece Big Bertha combo set with 2 hybrids and 6 irons for $1299.

The Big Bertha irons and hybrids will be in stores October 17.

Specs

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Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the 2015 Big Bertha irons in our forum.

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52 Comments

  1. Want to buy em

    Feb 15, 2015 at 5:40 pm

    When will the price drop
    Hate to buy em and a week later
    Could’ve got em for $300 less

  2. Mark

    Nov 20, 2014 at 11:11 pm

    I hit the alpha Hybrid during some testing and gained 30 yards consistently on the hybrid. current 3 hybrid is a 250 club worth 260 on a perfect strike, and hit the alpha 280 repetatively but 290 on a perfect strike. couldn’t even feel the ball off of the face. I can’t wait for another day of testing more product.

  3. Bert

    Nov 3, 2014 at 1:13 pm

    Wife decided her new Mizuno’s were out of the bag and going in were the 2015 Big Bertha irons with “Recoil” shafts. Lucky she hesitated and asked the right questions and I did the research and found the supposed Recoil shafts are not offered by Callaway and to get “real” Recoil shafts you must pay a $75 upgrade per club. Now think about it; Callaway charges you $75 upgrade for a $40 shaft and keeps the original shaft (whatever a 460 Recoil is. This is another gimmick to fool the buyer into believing they’re not. My wife was fitted by a rep using their fitting cart. She hit an iron with a 660 Recoil shaft and was never told the shafts she received would be different (460’s). She was never told the factory shafts were something of less quality.

    Advice; BUYER BEWARE and stay abreast of technology since the fitter will tell you anything you wish to hear and sell you something you weren’t fitted with.

    So the bottom line is the shafts being sold in the 2015 Callaway Big Bertha Irons are not the Recoil shafts played by better golfers and Callaway will not tell you such. They are a lesser, cheaper iron shaft and if you desire a Recoil Shaft be prepared to pay quite a bit more.

  4. Chris

    Oct 17, 2014 at 12:32 pm

    Would love to see the handicaps of people commenting on these irons. Also consider most high handicappers slice the ball. In fact roughly 80 percent of golfers slice the ball.

    There is definitely a target group of golfers for these irons, and they will help them. Personally, I’m hitting the hybrids on my way home. I currently game the 913H.

  5. Alex T

    Oct 7, 2014 at 4:45 pm

    Seen it all before. Fusion. Slingshot. Rocketballz. Etc. These kinds of designs are as niche as butter knife thin blades. There’s only about 1% of golfers who could actually get any benefit out of them, the only difference being that everybody wishes they were good enough to hit blades. Nobody wishes they were bad enough to hit these monstrosities. These will be forgotten in a heartbeat and will be on sale for $499 by next march. Here’s a tip: If you want two clubs more distance hit two clubs more. 20 yards more distance and I won’t even charge you $1000 dollars for it.

  6. marcel

    Sep 30, 2014 at 2:13 am

    well what counts is being on the fairway… yes BB hit further but he lost control and ended up in sand… these clubs are “game improvement” clubs for 30+ handicapers

  7. simon

    Sep 25, 2014 at 4:00 am

    I’m pretty sure if you measured the swing speed on those two 6 iron shots they would be very different.
    Maybe the Big Bertha does go further but certainly not 23 yards.
    Plus they are seriously ugly to my eye.The top edge must 8-10mm. A little thicker than a garden spade.

  8. JH

    Sep 25, 2014 at 1:39 am

    Is the target golfer of these clubs really going to plunk down $1000+ for a set of these?

    Can’t believe that price tag.

  9. BeenInHB33

    Sep 25, 2014 at 12:53 am

    Maybe the ugliest irons I’ve ever seen.

  10. Phat

    Sep 25, 2014 at 12:37 am

    Haha so the old 1 or 2 iron is now a 4 iron. Took me a while to figure out why the new school 4 irons were hard to hit.

  11. Gonzo

    Sep 25, 2014 at 12:30 am

    I wonder if these will stay at this price point, like the Apex, or be subject to massive price cuts, like the X2 Hot.

  12. Jeff Daschel

    Sep 24, 2014 at 11:17 pm

    Anybody else think it’s funny P Reed hit a hook with the new big Bertha iron ? Middle of the fairway 186 or 209 in the left bunker? No wonder high caps don’t get better

    • BeenInHB33

      Sep 25, 2014 at 12:55 am

      HAHA was thinking the same thing! There’s like a foot of offset on these “irons” lol. Terrible. These should cost $75 or less.

    • Ben

      Sep 25, 2014 at 2:00 pm

      Way too much offset. I feel bad for the high capper who struggles with a hook because the GI selections on the market will only make it worse.

      • Eugene Marchetti

        Dec 19, 2014 at 9:08 pm

        I totally agree. I hit these hybrids/irons this week and the offset was very visible. Consequently, I actually hit them way right because I was so afraid I would hook the heck out of them, I didn’t release the club. Too thick and too offset for me.

  13. Joey

    Sep 24, 2014 at 9:34 pm

    Tisk tisk. The more things change the more they stay the same. Pure propaganda, their selling campaign at this point.

  14. Jimmy

    Sep 24, 2014 at 9:12 pm

    1300 bucks with hybrids and the irons are not forged WONDER WHY NO ONE WANTS TO PLAY THIS GAME ANYMORE i could see if it was hybrid 3-7 irons 9-pw with graphite shafts all around but man those are nit cheap you better get your 2 clubs worth of distance

  15. Vandy

    Sep 24, 2014 at 8:39 pm

    Anyone else notice that the specs read that the 4 iron is at 20.5…. about half a degree stronger than a normal 3 iron, and are at 39.125″. So yeah their “4” iron will go farther than yours.

  16. Justin

    Sep 24, 2014 at 6:31 pm

    Is it just me, or does the hybrid look similar to a Titleist 910h?

    • Peter

      Sep 25, 2014 at 10:42 pm

      yes they do. the only reason why i read some comments was to see if anyone else thought so too. i think its the big fat toe on the above view and it also has a surefit hosel lol.

  17. Desmond

    Sep 24, 2014 at 4:39 pm

    In the late 90’s those would be called hybrids, not irons….

  18. Pingbrad

    Sep 24, 2014 at 3:55 pm

    The longer distance comes from bending the clubs stronger and lengthening the shafts. The 5 iron is this set equivalent to most other manufactures 4 iron.

  19. Feel

    Sep 24, 2014 at 3:35 pm

    They feel awesome!

  20. Don

    Sep 24, 2014 at 3:11 pm

    Sometimes I get the feeling these companies think we are all lemmings and that they can guide us to the cliff.

  21. mrjoe

    Sep 24, 2014 at 2:52 pm

    So what’s new here? Cup face has been done in irons. Max COR has been done in irons.

    Callaway just catching up.

  22. Lime Shark

    Sep 24, 2014 at 2:07 pm

    The Callaway 7-iron has a loft of 30 degrees and a length of 37.25 inches.

    Compare that to the Ping G5:

    Ping G5 6-iron – loft = 30.5 degrees, length = 37.25 inches.

    Ping G% 7-iron – loft = 34 degrees, length = 36.75 inches.

    At least one club worth of “extra length” can be attributed to the fact that the 7-iron is really a 6-iron.

    • TW

      Sep 24, 2014 at 2:52 pm

      I was gonna say the same thing.
      most standard 4 irons are 24-25 degrees, callaways is 20.5. I am and have been a pure callaway guy for a few years. Will likely keep my hex chrome plus but will be looking to go another route on irons this season. (looking at titleist first and might give nike a shot, on balls and irons but doubt I switch balls)

  23. Thomas J Coyne jr

    Sep 24, 2014 at 1:38 pm

    And we all wonder what the reasoning is for the loss of golfers, beginners, sales of equipment, golf course closures? All of this stuff is made in China. All of it is also duplicated with another name, like Bertha/Bursur. The new gimmicks, soul weighting, comeon, Browning did that with the 440 and 440 plus 40 years ago. I’m still hitting them and regrove them myself. I also have a set of Bursurs. Talked to the importer-he said they come from the same factory as Callaway’s. Only the price is 90% cheaper. We live near a small country golf course, 9 holes, par 36 each 9 from 2 sets of tees, some holes are short but it’s in good shape and hilly, greens are small, upsets visiting pros, when they barely break par. Price for 9 is around 10 or 12 for seniors. Cart for another 5 or 6. Affordable, but it’s the only deal in the Portland, Oregon area. All others are in the 40’s plus for 18. In these economy days this is why golfers are dropping out, plus the fact that there is less organized golf now. Used to have local men’s clubs, every Sat., all gone as the clubs want fresh money and it’s not there, so they lost all around.
    I asked some kids why they were spending more time on the I-phone than playing sports. Easier, less cost, no instruction, no pressure from coaches, teach themselves, Keep up with their friends or what they call important stuff. It’s all about money-eh?

  24. Scooter McGavin

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:42 pm

    And people need to stop complaining about strong lofts on distance irons. That lower loft is there to help with distance. You can’t compare your old or Player’s club lofts to something where the weighting has been engineered to launch the ball higher. Higher launch means they can strengthen the clubs and still maintain ideal ball launch/height.

    • Lane

      Sep 24, 2014 at 1:48 pm

      So at what point does it become apples to apples? You say can’t compare because of weighting, yet the manufacturer will want to compare when they make distance claims (2 clubs longer). So how about you call them up and say they can’t claim that because the weighting of the club is different and can’t be compared to older irons?

      • NMBob

        Sep 24, 2014 at 11:21 pm

        exactly. If this goes two clubs farther..ha ha ha what a crock of you know what. That would make my pitching wedge go a full 150. What iron set has no irons you can score with inside 150. Did they just reinvent the nike slingshot? You guys know how many guys I have had to sell real pitching wedges to that had burner 2s or diablos with 41.5 deg pitching wedges that cam e in the set. At what point do folks start to remember they need a set of tools spread across distances to help them score and changing the numbers on clubs and in truth simply removing the Pw and now almost 9 irons from folks sets leaves them without the tools to score from certain yardages. Also, making that shaft longer, how many 4 or 5 irons are now pushed out of the realm of consisting hitting because it is just too long?

    • Chris

      Oct 17, 2014 at 12:28 pm

      Titleist explained this well last year with the new 714 line, and how moving the CG around necessitates the decreasing in loft to get the proper trajectory for each iron.

      People continue to go on, and on, ad nauseam about “de-lofting”, “longer shafts”, blah, blah, blah. If you don’t like them, don’t buy them. You aren’t offering anything earth shattering to the equation here.

      • Viper

        Oct 21, 2014 at 9:59 pm

        I agree with Chris if you don’t like the irons, don’t buy them and moved on. I just played our club championships (match play) the guy who came runner up, gamed this irons and his almost scratch 1.1 index, his in mid 30s and using the F3 Regular Flex Recoil.

  25. Scooter McGavin

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:38 pm

    I thought it was called a “cup face”, not a “face cup”.

    • OhioGolfDude

      Sep 25, 2014 at 9:50 am

      Take a look at the photo of the hybrid – it specifically states “Hyper Speed Face Cup”

  26. Boner

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:31 pm

    Wow the ball went on fire with the Big Bertha iron!!!!!! Those irons mean serious business! I have already per-ordered, can’t wait!!!!!!

  27. dapadre

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:28 pm

    These look more like Hybrid irons. I find the 2 clubs longer claim though, sighting that my 5 iron is 28deg and this is 23deg. So essentially my 5 iron is their 7/8 iron, ok I get it. Do like the look of the hybrid but at $249, come on.

  28. Ev

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:14 pm

    Think I’ve finally found a possibly replacement for my X-12’s!

  29. RobN

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:12 pm

    The irons? No thanks, I’ll stick with my Apex. Now that hybrid I DO like!! The adjustable hosel should make that one a winner. But I’m still not giving up my X2 Hots. They are just too good.

  30. Don

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:10 pm

    These look … clunky to me. Not really drumming up any excitement for Callaway for me.

  31. jc

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:08 pm

    that’s why I went to ping….not as many changes…and only every couple of years between the next ones….I will stick with my g25s even if they don’t have turbulators or a new name.

  32. JIMMY

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:05 pm

    Yikes, probably great for 25-capper, that huge offset screams,
    FORE LEFT!!!!!!!

    • Roger S.

      Sep 24, 2014 at 2:24 pm

      I would seriously hook those clubs about 100 yards left. The ball would probably make a 90* in the air.

      • li0scc0

        Jul 28, 2017 at 9:36 am

        Then you are not a very good golfer. I’m a 12 handicap, and I can hit these, or a zero offset, straight. My 6 iron distance is 198, generally. Offset does not cause hooks, draws, etc.

  33. BcavWecllh

    Sep 24, 2014 at 12:04 pm

    The sole of the irons look like the Rocketballz.

  34. David Smith

    Sep 24, 2014 at 11:58 am

    This is sad… what is going on?!?!

  35. cb

    Sep 24, 2014 at 11:56 am

    Hey patrick swing easy with this club and now really go at it with this club. Oh my gosh! your second swing went farther than the first!

  36. WHY!?

    Sep 24, 2014 at 11:43 am

    So many lines and models. Its TM vs. Callaway these days. I can see Monte playing these when you consider his current gamers.The hybrid doesnt look that bad. Not much offset and nice shape.

  37. SMH

    Sep 24, 2014 at 11:17 am

    Sadly they’re really starting to become like TMAG and just jamming product after product down the consumer’s throat. I still haven’t hit a hybrid yet that I would take over the old Titleist 503H that I’ve been playing since it first came out.

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Whats in the Bag

Justin Thomas’ winning WITB: 2019 CJ Cup

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Driver: Titleist TS3 (9.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana ZF 60TX

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3-wood: Titleist TS3 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro Blue 80TX

5-wood: Titleist 915Fd (18 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Motore Speeder VC 9.2 Tour Spec X

Irons: Titleist T100 (4-iron), Titleist 620 MB (5-9)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Vokey Design SM7 (46, 52, 56 degrees), Vokey Design SM6 (60 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Photo via Vokey Wedge Rep Aaron Dill

Putter: Scotty Cameron X5

Grip: SuperStroke Pistol GT Tour

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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How @justinthomas34 marks his @titleist Pro V1x ????

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Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord

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Whats in the Bag

Cameron Champ WITB 2019

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*Equipment accurate as of the Houston Open

Driver: Ping G410 LST (9.5 degrees, flat+, CG shifter in neutral, 5g face, 5g toe weight)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Smoke Green 70G-6.5 TX (44.25″, tipped 1.5″, D4)

cameron-champ-witb-2019-driver

5-wood: Ping G410 (@17 degrees, flat standard, 5g face weight)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Black 95G-6.5 TX (41.75”, tipped 1.5″, D4)

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Irons: Ping i500 [3-iron (38.75″, 21 degree loft, 1 degree up)], Ping iBlade [4-iron (1/2 degree flat, standard length)], Ping Blueprint [5-PW (1/2 degree flat, standard length)]
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold X7 w/Cushin insert

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Wedges: Ping Glide Forged (50, 54 degrees) (1 degree flat), TaylorMade Hi-Toe (60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Ping PLD Prime Prototype (Stealth finish, straight arc, 34 3/8″, 19 degree lie, 2 degree loft, black shaft)
Grip: Ping PP58 Midsize Full Cord

Grips: Custom Lamkin Black 58R

Ball: Srixon Z-Star XV

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight: EV3D putters

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We hear the buzz words “3D printed” all the time these days. It’s a newer technology that has shown to have lots of applications in other industries, but golf hasn’t been one of those until now. 3D printing a putter is a pretty new adventure, but EV3D Golf is showing that it is going to be much more common very soon.

EV3D Golf is bringing new putter designs to us golfers that CANNOT be made through traditional casting or milling. 3D printing is the process of creating a putter layer-by-layer, allowing any supported shape you can think of. Even hollow designs like EV3D’s signature lattice features!

This gives EV3D engineers the ability to create putters that push the limits of MOI, feel, and of course look. The intricate lattice design does more than just look really cool, it also helps move weight to the outside and rear of the putter, increasing MOI in all models. All EV3D putters are printed from a combination of 420 stainless steel and bronze. This alloy gives the putter its responsive feel, excellent durability, and the ability to offer 3 finishes. They also offer a ton of different hosel designs to fit your eye and putting stroke, all are 3D printed as well. EV3D even adds custom touches like text in the cavity, different site lines, and paint fill to make it your own. Right now they offer 6 different head shapes, but if none of those are what you are looking for, they will work with you to print your dream putter from scratch!

We got our hands on 2 models, the EV3D Golf Ares X and Hades, to take out to the course and putt with. In hand the first thing that grabs your eye’s attention is the intricate lattice work on the putters.

All you want to do is hold the putter closer to your face and see how the heck they did it. At the right angles you can actually see through that lattice structure, but we were told that debris getting stuck in there isn’t an issue. The next thing you will notice is the rough texture of the head. This is created by the process of 3D printing the head, showing off the layers of material used to build the shape of the head. I don’t know if was intended but that rough texture does help with reducing glare, making the putters easy on the eyes even in the brightest conditions.

I personally really like the Antique Bronze finish, but EV3D does offer a Natural and Slate Black finish to suit your personal taste. Out on the putting green the Ev3D putters performed really well, offering a hefty dose of forgiveness and a crisp feel and sound. Traditionally modes like the Hades don’t offer much in the way of forgiveness compared to mallets, but the Hades shocked me with its off-center putts. Putts hit off the heel or toe stayed on line much better and I even made a couple that had no business even being close to the hole.

Distance loss on those mishits is about what you would expect, coming up a little short, but defiantly not a drastic difference. Since the EV3D line doesn’t have any fancy face milling, I was a little worried about the initial roll and if the ball would hop or skid. Initial contact was great, only met with a tiny bit of skid before rolling out. Nothing that I think effected even my longest putts. The feel off the face is something that reminds you of a quieter classic Ping BeCu putter, crisp with an audible click. If you are looking for a silent impact, like an Odyssey Microhinge, then the EV3D line might not be your cup of tea. If you are on a quest for exceptional responsiveness on well struck and mishit putts then you should be very pleased with any of the EV3D putter models. The feel of impact is a little firmer than I think we are all used to these days with so many inserts and deep milling. The crisp feel and slightly more audible EV3D is somewhat refreshing and mishit putts are extremely easy to recognize.

Overall, the EV3D putters are a solid offering from a new company utilizing a new technology in the golf club space. With all the combinations of putter heads, site lines, and hosels, I can’t see you not being able to find a putter that fits your eye. Looks for any putter are going to be subjective, but there is no denying that EV3D is pushing the limits at a time where we see a lot of similar putter designs from all manufacturers. And if you are the type of person who wants to create an original design of your own that has never been done, EV3D is waiting for that call to help you take your idea from thought to printed putter head! Check the entire EV3D putter line at the company website.

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