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WRX Custom Putter Showcase: Pick the Winner!

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You have just stumbled into putter heaven, a land where no one cares about making putts. There’s only one thing that truly matters here: how awesome looking is the club?

We sent out a challenge to some of the industry’s top boutique putter makers and told them to dream big. No rules, just design the coolest custom putter anyone has ever seen before. Easy enough, right?

The Participants

So we’re putting the vote to you, the reader, to decide which company churned out the best design. To help you out, we’ll provide the project name, the designer, the technology and what went into designing each putter. Of course, there are also a ton of of photos.

Make sure to vote — the poll is at the bottom of this page — and leave your thoughts about each putter in the comment section at the end of this story. Enjoy your experience in a land where three-putts don’t matter and looking good reigns supreme.

Machine Golf

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Project Name: Delta Proto-1
Custom Designer: David Billings

“You can change the toe hang by up to 15 degrees,” Billings said. “That’s the first time that’s been offered on a putter.”

Tech Info: This putter remains true to its name; it’s a MACHINE. It has all the bells, whistles and gadgets you’d expect from something with such a name. The Delta Proto-1 offers three interchangeable grips (two leather, one aluminum), six weights and two back flanges, which like the head and neck are made from flame-torched Stainless Steel Damascus with a Damascus Titanium logo medallion and has Delta Mod Adjusters that can be stacked to adjust the balance/toe hang.

Wait, did I just say that one of the grips was made from aluminum? Yes, one of the grips, called a Hog, is made from 6061 Aerospace Aluminum Alloy that offers a unique, round grip feel and helps with counterbalancing.

The putter also has a “skeletonized” neck and hosel, which come in the form of spine-like cut outs, and one of the back flanges has “bongo” cuts that look like bongo (or zebra) stripes. The finish on the putter was also produced with a torching process that makes this prototype feel right at home in the jungle.

Do golf courses actually allow this putter near their premises? Just add a “dab of epoxy” and this baby is USGA conforming, Billings says.

Kingston Putters

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Project Name: The Chive
Custom Designer: Kyle Sears

“We wanted to showcase that we can do anything to a putter,” Sears said. “Any random logo or saying, we can do.”

Tech Info: The Chive and WRX unite at last. “Keep Calm and Chive On” is The Chive’s calling card, and you’ve undoubtedly seen someone on the street or in a bar with a Chive T-shirt or sweatshirt. Surely there’s some GolfWRXers who are also part of Chive Nation?

And it’s for charity. A certain percentage of profits from each “Keep Calm and Chive On” putter will go to ChiveCharities.

The putter was milled from a solid block of soft carbon steel, but this is different from Kingston’s other designs in that there’s no nickel or satin finish. Sears, the custom designer from Kingston, decided to leave the putter with a raw look, which will produce a nostalgic, patina rust over time. Since it’s raw with no finish, remnants from the milling process are left all over the club head: a crude but flattering look.

This a one-off, but knowing Chive Nation and GolfWRX, the demand will be high.

Byron Golf Design

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Project Name: Roll Abides
Custom Designer: Byron Morgan

“I’ve never seen anything that looks like this putter in my life,” Morgan said.

Tech Info: We haven’t either. The Roll Abides was handmade by Byron Morgan himself. For this custom design, he used carbon steel in the back and aluminum in the front to make the back part of the putter two-third’s heavier than the front.

The cut out behind the putters’ face allowed Morgan to eliminate weight near the face, without a see-through cut seen from other putters on the market. He described the club head’s profile as more conventional looking than other oversized mallet putters, with more technology to produce a higher MOI. The weight proportions give the putter maximum forgiveness.

With a “Tight Tuna Mill” on the face, the face-milling has high points that grab the golf ball, which gets the ball rolling quicker on the ground.

Surfing was a large part of Morgan’s childhood, which inspired the look of the custom headcover design. The woman’s silhouette is called, “Sally the Surfer,” who was named after his wife, Sally.

SeeMore Putter Company

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Project Name: Tour Limited Private Reserve “Diving Board” Prototype
Custom Designer: Andre Shmoldas, VP of Design

“This putter is something new to the world that no one has ever seen before,” said Jim Grundberg, CEO of the SeeMore Putting Co. “You won’t see it in stock anytime soon. It’s a one-off, a tour limited.”

Tech info: SeeMore recently secured the patent for the “diving board,” as the company calls it. Of course, someone already has the patent for the one that sits near the deep end of your local pool, and both are currently non-USGA conforming.

SeeMore’s putter does conform, however, if you take off the detachable aluminum diving board. When it’s attached, it serves the same purpose as the company’s conforming Rifle Scope Technology (RST), which helps golfers make a perfect, arcing stroke time after time, but makes the technology available for putter designs with traditional offset.

The one-off stainless steel putter was heat-treated and torched to achieve its honey-like finish, and its Argyle face design, which was created using the company’s diamond cut milling process, giving it a Scottish vibe.

There’s only 25 of these putters in existence, and each has a different finish to make every one of them truly one of a kind.

Time to vote

Which putter is your favorite?

  • Machine: Delta Proto-1 (50%, 1,274 Votes)
  • SeeMore: Diving Board (21%, 523 Votes)
  • Byron Morgan: The Roll Abides (15%, 375 Votes)
  • Kingston: Keep Calm and Chive On (14%, 370 Votes)

Total Voters: 2,542

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See what GolfWRX members are saying about these putters as well as dozens of additional photos in our forum.

Note: Each of these putters will be returned to their designers. We would have (really) loved to hold onto them, but it would be wrong to keep them from their rightful owners. 

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34 Comments

34 Comments

  1. Doug Sevier

    Aug 31, 2014 at 11:08 pm

    I love the Kingston KCCO putter. Would love to see how it feels, and would definitely bag it!

  2. David Smith

    Aug 31, 2014 at 8:35 pm

    I feel like I just threw up in my mouth… these are hideous!

  3. Stan

    Aug 31, 2014 at 1:37 pm

    I’m a huge Morgan fan but the Machine is hands down the winner in my humble opinion. The mod selection is incredible even if it’s not my preferred shape. I drool nightly over their Damascus M9 putter minus the $4000 price tag. If any rich, childless couples are looking to adopt a 38 year old son your prayers have been answered.

  4. John

    Aug 30, 2014 at 6:58 pm

    None of the above!!!

  5. Sean

    Aug 29, 2014 at 7:22 pm

    The Delta Proto-1 is a really beautiful putter.

  6. j.a.

    Aug 29, 2014 at 4:58 pm

    No matter than my favourite head style is the Kingston, in this post my attention went immediately to the Machine and the Byron.

    The Machine blew me away. That’s an incredible design, truly a custom putter that can be customised at any time. Dave Billings is thinking out of the box with this piece that looks out of this galaxy. It would be super interesting to try it and find out how it performs. Not sure about those stripes though, I’d prefer a simpler finish.

    The Byron is elegant, unique an minimalistic up to the extent that it doesn’t say it’s a Byron. I like the idea of using two materials with the heavier at the back as it increases the MOI. I guess that putts come “automatically” with this design.

  7. No one method

    Aug 29, 2014 at 12:42 am

    Isn’t the contest about being creative? Doing something new that the maker doesn’t normally do?

    Byron wins hands down. A completly HAND made all new model with all the modern day bells and whistles in an easy package.
    Two nice Anser heads and another pretty steam punked machined machine with a million parts.

    • Dave Billings

      Aug 29, 2014 at 12:09 pm

      Hi No one method, as I’ve posted below, I hope you can see I didn’t just focus on the head with this entry, although the head does contain brand new technologies nobody had seen when we submitted it, including the alloy morph spacer (allowing you to change the shape and depth of the head), and the Delta Mods in the hosel (allowing you to change the loft, lie and toe hang / face flow). The shaft and grip technologies are also totally new – first seen in public here. I hope you’ll see the creativity and ingenuity in these systems and innovations. I do love the Byron too – it reminds me somewhat of my old HOG 1004 with the architecture being very similar but the lines more square.

  8. Drew

    Aug 28, 2014 at 10:14 pm

    I am a Scotty Cameron collector and that Machine putter is fantastic. I love it when something with lots of modern features and interchangeable parts comes together so beautifully. I think a lot of people, especially golfers, don’t try newer equipment because it looks odd or too different and with looks and feel being so important in golf it IS something that matters. Great work and that is definitely something I would LOVE to give a roll.

    Second place to me goes to the Kingston. I am partial to the more traditional looking putters and even I get burnt out on seeing the same Anser style putters and looks. But when you pull it off this beautifully and make a great statement about the level of craftsmanship, people will notice. GREAT work, love the decision to keep it raw and let the milling shine, its beautiful, why cover it up with a finish? Great work.

    The See More is really well done too. It isn’t as striking to me but the removable diving board it cool. I was so glad when I read it was removable. I would definitely give it a roll.

    The Byron is the most ambitious and I think it looks pretty cool. It just seems to be slightly off? I thought that maybe a few small changes would make it more appealing. Knowing his craftsmanship I am sure it would roll it beautifully and I love the theme, but a few more touches and changes would be great.

    • Dave Billings

      Aug 29, 2014 at 12:04 pm

      Thanks Drew! Really appreciate it especially coming from a Scotty collector. Just wish he and some of the other makers had joined us in this fun project. Maybe next one!

  9. J.Jimenez

    Aug 28, 2014 at 10:03 pm

    Let be truly honest here:

    If originality is what this contest is about, Byron

    If we are looking for the best PING Anser based design, MACHINE .

    Winner, Byron

    • Dave Billings

      Aug 29, 2014 at 12:02 pm

      Thanks J. Respect your vote and opinion. I hope the new technologies in the neck, spacer and grip and shaft do qualify as being original – at least that’s what we tried to accomplish with this entry. I love all the other entries and could have voted for any of them too.

  10. Ed Robertson

    Aug 28, 2014 at 8:34 pm

    Machine is stunning. WOW! And, after putting with their putters for over a year now, nothing compares in feel and craftsmanship. LOVE, LOVE, LOVE!!!!!!!!!!!!

  11. Smitty

    Aug 28, 2014 at 7:13 pm

    Have to ask cuz it stands out to me, is that a steelfiber in the machine??

    • Dave Billings

      Aug 29, 2014 at 11:58 am

      Hi Smitty, yes, good eyes! That’s a Steelfiber proprietary putter flex shaft made for us by Aerotech. With a few modifications at the butt-end done in our in-house machine shop. 🙂

  12. slide13

    Aug 28, 2014 at 4:51 pm

    That Machine putter is sweet, really nice! I love Byron putters, play with a DH89 and wouldn’t trade it for anything, but the one above is just not my style and not as cool as the Machine. Hard to not vote Byron because I love his work, but with those 4 putters above, the Machine is where it’s at!

  13. Merty Huckle

    Aug 28, 2014 at 4:47 pm

    I feel like I’ve seen all the putters before except the idea Byron created. We have a Machine that looks like a Machine, and two Ping Ansers.

    Something new was the idea, right?

    • Dave Billings

      Aug 29, 2014 at 11:56 am

      Hi Merty, I hope you may have noticed the new Delta Mod Adjusters, the new Alloy Morph Spacer, and the new Delta Adjustable and Interchangeable grip and shaft technologies? All of these are brand new!

  14. Bob Halvorsen

    Aug 28, 2014 at 4:41 pm

    Their is a putter maker from Melbourne,Australia..Mr. Kari Lajosi..his putters blow all these makers away.

    • j.a.

      Aug 29, 2014 at 4:22 pm

      Oh yes! You are so right. Kari Lajosi deserved a spot here.

  15. West

    Aug 28, 2014 at 4:18 pm

    That dog on the Machine is pretty awesome!

    • Dave Billings

      Aug 29, 2014 at 11:50 am

      Thanks West – that’s our former family dog and mascot Birdie – she shagged balls for me when I was prototyping the very first HOG putter 20 years ago so she had to go into our logo. We engrave her on all heads now made in house in our machine shop here in Plano Texas (we moved from Dallas eight years ago). Birdie is now in doggie Heaven keeping everyone there happy and in stitches. Hopefully we are honoring her memory well.

  16. blink3665

    Aug 28, 2014 at 4:06 pm

    They are all fantastic putters. My vote goes to the Machine. The finish and look of that thing is gorgeous!

    • Dave Billings

      Aug 29, 2014 at 11:47 am

      Thanks Blink, so glad you like the finish on the Stainless Damascus – I actually used three different techniques – working to make the flanges match the head and hosel, but also tie in the colors from the Aerotech steelfiber shaft and the Aluminum HOG Grip.

  17. Zmangolf

    Aug 28, 2014 at 3:51 pm

    The Byron is the must see putter here..As usual..Byron is the winner!!!

  18. TR1PTIK

    Aug 28, 2014 at 3:46 pm

    The Machine Delta Proto-1 is definitely the most impressive of the bunch, but the Kingston and SeeMore putters have a great look as well. I especially like the fact that the “diving board” on the SeeMore is detachable so you have something to practice with, but a nice clean looking putter to game. The Roll Abides mallet putter by Byron just doesn’t do anything for me.

  19. Chad

    Aug 28, 2014 at 3:45 pm

    That Machine putter is insane.

  20. Albert Sewill

    Aug 28, 2014 at 3:31 pm

    BestGrips Silver Carbon Fiber Pistol Putter Grip with the Machine Delta-1 Proto. What what!

    • Dave Billings

      Aug 29, 2014 at 11:44 am

      @Albert Sewill, thanks for the awesome grip! Very proud to show it off with our new Delta interchangeable and adjustable grip and shaft technology!

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Equipment

10 interesting photos from Wednesday at the Honda Classic

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From our featured image of Rory McIlroy putting in a different kind of work on the range in the pre-dawn hours of Wednesday morning, to shots of Tiger Woods’ similarly early pre-pro-am range work, to some intriguing shots Patrick Reed’s prototype Bettinardi putter, GolfWRX has plenty of fantastic photo content from PGA National.

Here are some of the best shots from Wednesday.

Tiger Woods at work prior to his crack-of-dawn pro-am tee time. Gentleman in the foreground: You do know that as the sun has not yet risen, you do not need a hat to aggressively combat its rays, right?

“My feet do not look like that at impact.”

All eyes on the Big Cat…except those focused on the live video on their cell phone screens…

Let’s take a closer look at Patrick Reed’s yardage book cover. Yep. As expected.

Do you think these two ever talk?

It looks like Captain Furyk already has some pre-Ryder Cup swag in the form of a putter cover.

If you’ve ever wondered why Rickie Fowler selected these interesting locations for his tattoos, this may be the answer: Visible when he holds his finish.

We’ve got a Pistol Pete sighting!

Patrick Reed’s droolworthy Bettinardi Dass prototype.

Fun fact: Wedges double as magnetic putter cover holders, as Jon Curran illustrates here. Healthy application of lead tape, as well, from the tour’s resident graffiti artist.

Wednesday’s Photos

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about the photos in our forums.

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Accessory Reviews

Review: FlightScope Mevo

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In 100 Words

The Mevo is a useful practice tool for amateur golfers and represents a step forward from previous offerings on the market. It allows golfers to practice indoors or outdoors and provides club speed, ball speed, smash factor, launch angle, spin rate, carry distance and flight time.

It also has a video capture mode that will overlay swing videos with the swing data of a specific swing. It is limited in its capabilities and its accuracy, though, which golfers should expect at this price point. All in all, it’s well worth the $499 price tag if you understand what you’re getting.

The Full Review

The FlightScope Mevo is a launch monitor powered by 3D Doppler radar. With a retail price of $499, it is obviously aimed to reach the end consumer as opposed to PGA professionals and club fitters.

The Mevo device itself is tiny. Like, really tiny. It measures 3.5-inches wide, 2.8-inches tall and 1.2-inches deep. In terms of everyday products, it’s roughly the size of an Altoids tin. It’s very easy to find room for it in your golf bag, and the vast majority of people at the range you may be practicing at won’t even notice it’s there. Apart from the Mevo itself, in the box you get a quick start guide, a charging cable, a carrying pouch, and some metallic stickers… more on those later. It has a rechargeable internal battery that reaches a full charge in about two hours and lasts for about four hours when fully charged.

As far as software goes, the Mevo pairs with the Mevo Golf app on your iOS or Android device. The app is free to download and does not require any subscription fees (unless you want to store and view videos of your swing online as opposed to using the memory on your device). The app is very easy to use even for those who aren’t tech savvy. Make sure you’re using the most current version of the firmware for the best results, though (I did experience some glitches at first until I did so). The settings menu does have an option to manually force firmware writing, but updates should happen automatically when you start using the device.

Moving through the menus, beginning sessions, editing shots (good for adding notes on things like strike location or wind) are all very easy. Video mode did give me fits the first time I used it, though, as it was impossible to maintain my connection between my phone and the Mevo while having the phone in the right location to capture video properly. The only way I could achieve this was by setting the Mevo as far back from strike location as the device would allow. Just something to keep in mind if you find you’re having troubles with video mode.

Screenshot of video capture mode with the FlightScope Mevo

Using the Mevo

When setting up the Mevo, it needs to be placed between 4-7 feet behind the golf ball, level with the playing surface and pointed down the target line. The distance you place the Mevo behind the ball does need to be entered into the settings menu before starting your session. While we’re on that subject, before hitting balls, you do need to select between indoor, outdoor, and pitching (ball flight less than 20 yards) modes, input your altitude and select video or data mode depending on if you want to pair your data with videos of each swing or just see the data by itself. You can also edit the available clubs to be monitored, as you will have to tell the Mevo which club you’re using at any point in time to get the best results. Once you get that far, you’re pretty much off to the races.

Testing the Mevo

I tested the FlightScope Mevo with Brad Bachand at Man O’ War Golf Center in Lexington, Kentucky. Brad is a member of the PGA and has received numerous awards for golf instruction and club fitting. I wanted to put the Mevo against the best device FlightScope has to offer and, luckily, Brad does use his $15,000 FlightScope X3 daily. We had both the FlightScope Mevo and Brad’s FlightScope X3 set up simultaneously, so the numbers gathered from the two devices were generated from the exact same strikes. Brad also set up the two devices and did all of the ball striking just to maximize our chances for success.

The day of our outdoor session was roughly 22 degrees Fahrenheit. There was some wind on that day (mostly right to left), but it wasn’t a major factor. Our setup is pictured below.

Outdoor testing setup with FlightScope X3 (foreground) and Mevo

The results of our outdoor testing are shown below. The testing was conducted with range balls, and we did use the metallic stickers. The range balls used across all the testing were all consistently the same brand. Man O’ War buys all new range balls once a year and these had been used all throughout 2017.  The 2018 batch had not yet been purchased at the time that testing was conducted.

Raw outdoor data captured with range balls including metallic stickers. Mevo data (blue) and X3 data (orange) were both generated from the same exact shots.

You’ll notice some peculiar data in the sand wedge spin category. To be honest, I don’t fully know what contributed to the X3 measuring such low values. While the Mevo’s sand wedge spin numbers seem more believable, you could visibly see that the X3 was much more accurate on carry distance. Below is a quick summary of the percent differences between each of the parameters as presented by the Mevo and the X3 in our outdoor session when separated out for each club. As previously mentioned, though, take sand wedge spin with a grain of salt.

Table showing the percent difference of each parameter between Mevo and X3 grouped by club (outdoor testing).

The first thing we noticed was that the Mevo displays its numbers while the golf ball is still in midair, so it was clear that it wasn’t watching the golf ball the entire time like the X3. According to the Mevo website, carry distance, height and flight time are all calculated while club speed, ball speed, launch angle and spin rate are measured. As for the accuracy of the measured parameters, the Mevo’s strength is ball speed. The accuracy of the other measured ball parameters (launch angle and spin rate) is questionable depending on certain factors (quality of strike, moisture on the clubface and ball, quality of ball, etc). I would say it ranges between “good” or “very good” and “disappointing” with most strikes being categorized as “just okay.”

As for the calculated parameters of carry distance, height and time, those vary a decent amount. Obviously, when the measurements of the three inputs become less accurate, the three outputs will become less accurate as a result. Furthermore, according to FlightScope, the Mevo’s calculations are not accounting for things like temperature, humidity, and wind. The company has also stated, though, that future updates will likely adjust for these parameters by using location services through the app.

Now, let’s talk about those metallic stickers. According to the quick start guide, the Mevo needs a sticker on every golf ball you hit, and before you hit each ball, the ball needs to be placed such that the sticker is facing the target. It goes without saying that it doesn’t sound like a whole lot of fun to spend time putting those stickers on every ball, let alone balls that will never come back to you if you’re at a public driving range. Obviously, people are going to want to avoid using the stickers if they can, so do they really matter? Below is a table of data showing the percent difference between the Mevo’s data and the X3’s data of what we collected outdoors with a driver and range balls with and without the use of the stickers.

Table showing how the percent difference of each parameter changes between Mevo and X3 when you use the metallic stickers and when you don’t

The FlightScope website says that the metallic stickers “are needed in order for the Mevo to accurately measure ball spin.” We observed pretty much the same as shown in the table above. The website also states they are working on alternative solutions to stickers (possibly a metallic sharpie), which I think is wise.

Another thing we thought would be worth testing is the impact of different golf balls. Below is a table of data showing the percent difference between the Mevo’s data and the X3’s data of what we collected outdoors with a driver and range balls as compared to Pro V1’s. All of this data was collected using the metallic stickers.

Table showing how the percent difference of each parameter changes between Mevo and X3 when you switch from range balls to Pro V1’s

As shown above, the data gets much closer virtually across the board when you use better quality golf balls. Just something else to keep in mind when using the Mevo.

Indoor testing requires 8 feet of ball flight (impact zone to hitting net), which was no problem for us. Our setup is pictured below. All of the indoor testing was conducted with Titleist Pro V1 golf balls using the metallic stickers.

Indoor testing setup with FlightScope X3 (foreground) and Mevo

The results of our indoor session are shown below.

Raw indoor data captured with Pro V1’s including metallic stickers. Mevo data (blue) and X3 data (orange) were both generated from the same exact shots.

Below is a quick summary of the percent differences between each of the parameters as presented by the Mevo and the X3 in our indoor session when separated out for each club.

Table showing the percent difference of each parameter between Mevo and X3 grouped by club (indoor testing)

On the whole, the data got much closer together between the two devices in our indoor session. I would think a lot of that can be attributed to the use of quality golf balls and to removing outdoor factors like wind and temperature (tying into my previous comment above).

As far as overall observations between all sessions, the most striking thing was that the Mevo consistently gets more accurate when you hit really good, straight shots. When you hit bad shots, or if you hit a fade or a draw, it gets less and less accurate.

The last parameter to address is club speed, which came in around 5 percent different on average between the Mevo and X3 based on all of the shots recorded. The Mevo was most accurate with the driver at 2.1 percent different from the X3 over all strikes and it was the least accurate with sand wedge by far. Obviously, smash factor accuracy will follow club speed for the most part since ball speed is quite accurate. Over every shot we observed, the percent difference on ball speed was 1.2 percent on average between the Mevo and the X3. Again, the Mevo was least accurate with sand wedges. If I remove all sand wedge shots from the data, the average percent difference changes from 1.2 percent to 0.7 percent, which is very, very respectable.

When it comes to the different clubs used, the Mevo was by far most accurate with mid irons. I confirmed this with on-course testing on a relatively flat 170-yard par-3 as well. Carry distances in that case were within 1-2 yards on most shots (mostly related to quality of strike). With the driver, the Mevo was reasonably close, but I would also describe it as generous. It almost always missed by telling me that launch angle was higher, spin rate was lower and carry distance was farther than the X3. Generally speaking, the Mevo overestimated our driver carries by about 5 percent. Lastly, the Mevo really did not like sand wedges at all. Especially considering those shots were short enough that you could visibly see how far off the Mevo was with its carry distance. Being 10 yards off on a 90 yard shot was disappointing.

Conclusion

The Mevo is a really good product if you understand what you’re getting when you buy it. Although the data isn’t good enough for a PGA professional, it’s still a useful tool that gives amateurs reasonable feedback while practicing. It’s also a fair amount more accurate than similar products in its price range, and I think it could become even better with firmware updates as Flightscope improves upon its product.

This is a much welcomed and very promising step forward in consumer launch monitors, and the Mevo is definitely worth a look if you’re in the market for one.

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pga tour

Sergio Garcia WITB 2018

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Equipment is accurate as of the 2018 Honda Classic (2/20/2018).

Driver: Callaway Rogue Sub Zero (9 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi KuroKage Dual Core 70TX

3 Wood: Callaway Rogue 3+ (13.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi KuroKage XT 80TX

5 Wood: Callaway Rogue Sub Zero (18 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi KuroKage XT 80TX

Irons: Callaway Apex Pro 16 (3, 4), Callaway Apex MB 18 (5-9 iron)
Shafts: Nippon Modus Tour 130x

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy 4 (48-10S, 54-10S, 58-08C)
Shafts: Nippon Modus Tour 130x

Putter: Odyssey Toulon Azalea
Grip: Super Stroke 1.0 SGP

Golf Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft

Related:

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about Garcia’s clubs.

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