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Mizuno MP-H5, MP-15 irons and MP-T5 wedges

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For decades, better players have fawned over Mizuno’s MP line of forged irons, while mid-to-high handicappers covered their eyes, but still looked through the creases in their fingers. The new MP-H5 and MP-15 irons still don’t invite high-handicappers to join the party, but the company improved their forgiveness while maintaining the looks, sound and feel that better players have come to expect from the clubs.

Related: Learn about Mizuno’s 2015 JPX irons

As for the new MP-T5 wedges, Mizuno has expanded its offering to include 25 different loft, bounce and grind combinations for both left and right-handed players. That puts Mizuno among the industry leaders in wedging offerings, making Mizuno’s latest wedge line a fit for a wider variety of players than ever.

MP-H5

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Mizuno’s MP-H5 irons are smaller, yet more-forgiving than the MP-H4 irons that they replace.

“MP” stands for “Mizuno Players,'” which means these clubs were created for the better players among the golfing population. According to Chuck Couch, vice president of product development at Mizuno, today’s golfers are bigger and stronger than ever, but golf courses are getting progressively more difficult as well. That had lead to many of those golfers opting for longer-flying, more forgiving irons to deal with the challenges of long courses, thicker rough and faster greens.

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Mizuno’s MP-H5 irons (left) and the MP-H4 irons they replace.

Last year’s MP-H4 line was designed as hittable irons for better players, placing them at the more-forgiving end of the MP spectrum. Despite the performance boost they received from their slightly larger size, Couch admitted that the irons were a bit too large for the player they were targeting.

“With the H4 irons, we hit a par 5 in two, but ended up making bogey,” Couch said. “We changed that with a pure-looking club and an understated design [in the H5].”

The MP-H5 irons have a topline that is considerably thinner than its predecessor, as well as a thinner sole that allows for better maneuverability through the turf. That gives them a more understated look than the MP-H4, but the new irons also have a higher moment of inertia (MOI) to produce better launch characteristics. How’d Mizuno do that?

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The MP-H5 irons (right) have considerably thinner top lines than last year’s MP-H4 irons. Impressively, the MP-H5 irons are actually more forgiving. 

As with previous Mizuno irons, the MP-H5 irons are made with the company’s Grain Flow forging process that improves the look and feel of the irons. Their 1770 maraging steel faces were able to be made thinner than their predecessors, however, saving engineers weight that could be redistributed around the perimeter of the club head to improve forgiveness. Additional forgiveness was added to the clubs with their hollow construction, which drives weight low and deep in the head to improve their launch conditions, particularly in the long irons.

Whereas the MP-H4 irons were a mixed set, with hollow long and mid irons and solid-faced short irons, the MP-H5 irons have an all-hollow construction that creates more consistency throughout the set.

MP-15

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The MP-15’s are the direct replacement for the company’s MP-59 irons, which were known for their workability, as well as their classic shape, look, sound and feel. The new MP-15’s maintain those characteristics and add 20 percent more forgiveness to the design.

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Mizuno’s MP-15 irons (left) and the MP-59 irons they replace.

With the MP-15’s, Mizuno engineers found a way to remove 38 grams of weight from the Grain Flow Forged irons — roughly 15 percent of their total weight — from their cavities, which is nearly double the weight the company was able to redistribute in the MP-59 irons. The weight was then added back to the irons in the form of a 7-gram titanium insert behind the impact area, which was blended with 3 grams of ABS polymer to improve feel. The rest of the weight was placed around the perimeter of the clubs to boost their MOI.

[quote_box_center]”We took everything that Luke and 1000 other tour players that we talked to liked about the MP-64 and Mp-59’s,” Couch said. “They feel the same as the 59’s, but we were way more strategic with our weight distribution to allow for a higher MOI. The pyramid shaped insert behind the hitting area allows for a larger sweet spot providing more forgiveness, without sacrificing the best qualities from the MP-64 or MP-59.”[/quote_box_center]

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At address, the MP-15 (right) and MP-59 irons are nearly identical, but the MP-15’s add 20 percent more forgiveness. 

Mizuno also used its Harmonic Impact Technology (H.I.T.), which measures feel and sound based on frequency and decibel-readings, to confirm that the MP-15’s closely replicated the feel of the company’s MP-64 irons, which are known as one of the best-feeling irons the company has produced in its history.

[quote_box_center]”There’s a difference between looking cool and being cool,” Couch said. “Although we spent a lot of time on cosmetics, we made a multi-material club head that maximized its discretionary weight … These irons are cool.”[/quote_box_center]

Both the MP-H5 and MP-15 irons will sell for $999 for an eight-piece set with a steel shafts ($1099 with graphite). The MP-H5 irons come stock with KBS Tour C-Taper Lite shafts, while the MP-15’s are sold with True Temper’s Dynamic Gold shafts.

Mizuno anticipates that better players will mix and match the long and mid irons from the MP-H5 line with the mid and short irons of the MP-15 line, so the company dropped the price of the MP-H5 irons by $100 to make it the same as the MP-15 irons and make it easier for them to do so.

According to Couch, it’s likely that Mizuno staff players Luke Donald and Charles Howell III will put a mix of the MP-H5 and the MP-15 in their bags after the Ryder Cup and FedEx Cup Playoffs.

The MP-H5 irons will be available in 1-PW, while the MP-15 irons will be available in 3-PW. They’ll be in stores on September 19 and available for presale August 29.

Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the MP-H5 and MP-15 irons, as well as the MP-T5 wedges in our forum.

MP-T5 Wedges

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To compete in today’s hypercompetitive wedge market, equipment companies have looked to offer the widest possible variety of grind, bounce and loft options so they can have a wedge that’s a perfect fit for each consumer. With its new MP-T5 wedges, Mizuno looked for a way to expand its wedge offerings without making the process of purchasing a wedge too confusing for consumers.

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[quote_box_center]”We took away that confusion by grinding the soles according to the bounce and loft of each wedge,” Couch said. “You don’t have to pick the grind and run the risk of mismatching the options because we did it for you.”[/quote_box_center]

The MP-T5 wedges are available in 25 different loft and bounce combinations, for both left and right-handed golfers, in lofts ranging from 49-to-62 degrees. The only choices you have to make is what loft you want, what bounce suits your game and what finish you desire, because Mizuno has already decided the grind and groove configuration depending on the choice you make.

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  • Low lofts: Mizuno’s MP-T5 gap wedges (49-to-53 degrees) have a classic C-grind with soft trailing edge relief. These wedges are mostly played from the fairway or rough using full swings, so golfers don’t need aggressive grinds, Couch said. These wedges also have the narrow, deep grooves that are designed to perform best on full shots.
  • Mid lofts: In the 54-to-58 degrees models, Mizuno gives golfers two different bounce options. Its low-bounce wedges have an aggressive C Grind for more versatility, while its high-bounce wedges have a soft trailing edge and a significant heel grind to aid performance on open-faced bunker shots. These wedges have wider, shallower grooves that perform better on open-faced shots around the green.
  • High lofts: Like the mid-lofted wedges, Mizuno’s MP-T5 high-lofted wedges (58-to-62 degrees) come in two options: high bounce and low bounce. The high-bounce wedges have an M Grind that stands for max bounce and max heel and toe relief, which helps prevent digging while still providing the versatility golfers need to hit delicate shots around the green. The lower-bounce models add more trailing edge relief and more grind on the heel. They also have wide, shallower grooves that add more touch around the greens.

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Below is a chart highlighting the specifications of Mizuno’s new MP-T5 wedges.

Screen Shot 2014-07-28 at 4.53.27 AM

The MP-T5 wedges are available in two finishes: Black Ion, which won’t rust with extended use, and White Satin. The wedges will sell for about $129.99 with True Temper’s Dynamic Gold Wedge shaft.

Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the MP-H5 and MP-15 irons, as well as the MP-T5 wedges in our forum.

 

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

30 Comments

30 Comments

  1. dabadass

    Nov 20, 2014 at 4:54 pm

    In the wedges it seems to me like there are only a few different heads and then they just bend them and slap a loft badge on the back.

  2. Jeff

    Nov 1, 2014 at 9:12 pm

    I was all set to make a sarcastic comment about how neat it is that an OEM finally found a way to move back the center of gravity in an iron.

    But then I saw those wedges, those things are gorgeous! Why do Mizuno staff players always use different wedges, those look great.

  3. Noahlevine2145

    Oct 11, 2014 at 7:20 pm

    how forgiving are the mp 15s though i am a 12 handicap and 13 years old should i get the 15s or the 850 forged? would prefer the 15

    • Jeff

      Nov 1, 2014 at 9:16 pm

      What do you like? If you like em and think they could make you enjoy the game that much more and you’ve got a way to buy them, get the ones you love. If you got the ones you just admitted you would rather not, every shot you ever hit that wasn’t arrow straight you’ll second guess. Go hit every iron on the market and buy the ones you love.

  4. jgpl001

    Sep 20, 2014 at 3:53 pm

    Very critical of the look of these when they first appeared here

    However, today I saw them and hit them and they are FANTASTIC

    Recently purchased 714 cb/mb mix, but now I am unsettled

    We’ll done Mizuno

  5. Eddy

    Aug 12, 2014 at 10:05 am

    I was really hoping that Mizuno would release a real pitching wedge with a 46 degree T5… Ah well…

  6. Jeff

    Aug 10, 2014 at 11:27 pm

    I bet anyone playing the M4’s isn’t thrilled to hear Mizuno refer to their irons as “ended up making a bogey”

  7. Eddie

    Aug 5, 2014 at 1:18 pm

    Those MP-H5s look much sleeker than the H4s. Very nice. Yet, does anyone have any info on them coming out with new JPX irons? Both EZs are hideous looking, the ugliest irons I’ve seen since the Ping G10s. And I am not thrilled with the JPX 825 Pros either. I am hoping they come up with new forged JPXs.

  8. Boris

    Aug 1, 2014 at 10:19 am

    Wow really like the mp15. But still prefer my mp 59 4,5,6 mp 4 7,8,9,pw

  9. Joseph

    Jul 30, 2014 at 1:36 pm

    Love all of the pics and both sets of new irons look really nice. If I could offer a suggestion, it would be really nice to know what club your looking at from the address position. Otherwise, you’re kind of guessing.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Jul 30, 2014 at 2:25 pm

      Joseph,

      If you view the thread in the forums, it’s much easier to tell exactly what club you’re viewing. We’re currently working on a fix for our front-page software that will make it easier to see what clubs you’re viewing as well.

      Thanks for reading.

  10. Sven Hallauer

    Jul 30, 2014 at 11:54 am

    Very exciting to see the MP-15 irons, definitely have to check them out for next season. Also great to see that Mizuno finally offers a 62-degree wedge, this might finally get me away from using my old Titleist wedge.

    As to the MP-H5, I was a fan of the Fli-Hi but hated the MP-H4 – so not sure if I should give this line another try or not.

  11. joselo

    Jul 30, 2014 at 11:13 am

    MPH5’s look a lot like the new nike’s protos… only 10,000 times better!

  12. Rich

    Jul 30, 2014 at 8:42 am

    Wow, so many loft options in the wedges. Different grinds too. Awesome!

  13. steve

    Jul 30, 2014 at 8:27 am

    Not Mizuno’s best work from a visual standpoint

  14. Christian

    Jul 29, 2014 at 7:49 pm

    Sept 21st, plenty of time to replace the spinners for s300’s please!

    • Christian

      Jul 29, 2014 at 7:50 pm

      Edit: nvm, in the video they have spinners.

  15. Ryan

    Jul 29, 2014 at 4:38 pm

    The look of the irons at address is what matters. Not ” badging “…

  16. jgpl001

    Jul 29, 2014 at 4:27 pm

    What’s happening with the mp r 12 wedge?

    Is it being replaced also or is Mizuno just going with one new wedge?

  17. Charlie

    Jul 29, 2014 at 12:54 pm

    Release date anyone?

  18. Chris

    Jul 29, 2014 at 12:26 pm

    I’m hoping they will offer the MP-H5 in a 2 iron. Also, as someone in a retail store, it’s nice to see the different loft options on the wedges to get a better gapping between today’s irons.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Jul 29, 2014 at 1:37 pm

      Yes, 1-PW.

      • Chris

        Jul 30, 2014 at 5:07 pm

        Awesome! Haven’t had a chance to talk to our rep about them yet, but having the 1 and 2 irons in those would be nice!

  19. Jordan

    Jul 29, 2014 at 12:08 pm

    I would be surprised if Luke actually switched to the 15’s or T5’s. I think the mp 59’s look way better. The badging looks less pronounced and just flows better with the rest of the cavity on the 59’s.

    • Tom

      Aug 28, 2014 at 9:03 pm

      Couldn’t agree less, love the new design – might make me change from my Mp62s at last!

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “How I learned to stop worrying and love single length irons”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from pinestreetgolf who shared his experience using single length irons. In pinestreetgolf’s excellent and thorough write-up, he explains just how single length irons worked for him, despite his previous suspects, and why he feels others should considering making the move to single length clubs in the future.

“First, I made a mistake I am constantly on others for making. I thought all-or-none. The whole “same stance, same swing, same plane” thing isn’t true. However, I decided that since one of them wasn’t true (if the lie changes, it all changes), then none of it was true. That was dumb. It’s about 80% true, and that is a lot. What I mean by that is that I struggle with ball position. Now I don’t. The club always feels the same, so you always just sort of start lining up the same all the time. It’s hard to describe, exactly. When my ball position creeps back, I start to get stuck. Now it doesn’t creep back. I grab the club, and the address position feels natural and easy.

Second, I made the mistake of thinking yardage gaps have to be consistent to be useful. They don’t. As my SL set tends towards its extremes, my gaps get larger. My 5 iron isn’t 10 yards behind my 6. But I know how far it is behind my six and I know I hit the center more often, so effectively, because I get much better contact, my gap is much more consistent even though it is smaller.

Third, I learned to hit a hybrid. I play them through 4 iron. I cannot get a SL 4 iron off the ground consistently, but my gaggle of G30 hybrids from the 2nd swing is fantastic.

Fourth, I kept my PM Grind for in and around the green complex.
Fifth, it makes practice MUCH more effective. Swap them out all the time. Hit a 6, hit a SW, hit a 9, hit a 7, rapid fire.

It took me a long time to get used to them, but the two massive pros are the setup/stance and practice. You set up the same way almost instinctively, and that is HUGE. I also feel like I get a ton more out of practice AND that my practice feels like the course a lot more.

There are some drawbacks. I found three specialty shots I had to add clubs at top and bottom to pull off:
1. A short-game only club, like a PM Grind.
2. Where the last SL doesn’t get airborne anymore. I used 3 hybrids below it. They hit middles of greens.
3. Ground balls – I can’t punch out nearly as well with a SL 5 as a CB 3 or 4. I’ve learned to use my driver on this shot.

If you are thinking about something new for irons and have some cash, I would recommend trying SL. It grew on me. I was wrong about it. The key is to stick with it. Just throw them in the bag for two months and when practicing switch up irons constantly – do NOT just bang one iron with an SL set.

Finally, either get fit or play with lie angle a lot. Mine are +3 up, and I’m only 6′. Feel great, dead even dirt line. But since they are all the same, they better be right. Just my thoughts on SL. They’ll be in my bag for the May – Sept. tournaments. I would highly recommend 1. ignoring my earlier posts on them and 2. trying them.”

Here are what a few of our members have said in response to pinestreetgolf’s post, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • snowman9000: “Some people get hung up on thinking that they aren’t supposed to have a shorter wedge. I kept one, no big deal. As to hybrids, that’s no biggie either. I mean, it’d be great if we could get good results with 13 clubs the same length, but that’s just not possible. Having SL irons is a huge simplification of the game, regardless of the rest of the bag.”
  • ChrisLC40: “OP I love how you summed everything up. I made the switch a little over two years ago and have made huge improvements. At times I think about going back to variable length irons because of the offerings, but OL is so repeatable, and I feel I may go backwards and need to relearn some things.”
  • LONGBALL777: “Welcome to the Dark Side!”

Entire Thread: “How I learned to stop worrying and love single length irons”

 

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Equipment

WRX Spotted: A pair of custom putters

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This week’s Zurich Classic is all about pairs — that goes for the two-man teams competing for the winner’s check(s), and in the case of notable putters we spotted, a pair of new one-off customs in bags this week: Abraham Ancer’s personal Bettinardi and Danny Lee’s new Scotty Cameron Super Rat.

Let’s start with the Danny Lee’s because there is a LOT going on with that club including first and foremost – it’s one nasty wand:

  • Super Rat head shape with a single sight line
  • The milled (actual) loft appears to be pretty standard for Cameron Putters
  • The hosel has been bent to accommodate Danny’s “armlock” style. This keeps the loft of the head where it should be while forward pressing. This kind of adjustment would need to be made to any standard putter if you were to try the armlock, or else you would deliver negative loft at impact
  • The shaft is LA Golf Shaft OZIK TP — a shaft designed to remove undesirable vibration through the shaft, while also reducing putter head oscillation at impact. Not a surprise considering the number of multi material/graphite putter shafts that are available right now to help improve consistency.
  • Last but not least a SuperStroke Flatso grip installed with the flat part of the grip aligned parallel to the putter face! This isn’t the first time we’ve seen something like this, and it makes sense – Utilizing the orientation of the grip to create greater awareness of the face angle can help players of all skill levels create more consistent results, even tour pros.

Danny has had an interesting golf bag to follow this season with a number of changes coming almost weekly from irons to putters. Maybe this change could help turn his putting around (currently ranked 116th in strokes gained: putting), all while still being inside the top 50 in the FedEx Cup.

Now to Abraham Ancer’s new Custom DASS BBZero Tour Dept. Putter.

  • This putter is based off of the BBZerostyle head with rounded bumpers and a plumbers neck
  • Compared to the BBZero though, the heel is thicker and it could have a slightly shorter blade length (TBD)
  • It has a recessed sight line on the top that runs perpendicular to the sight line in the flange to form a “T.” This is interesting for a couple of reasons including that it looks to be the width of a golf ball, which could help Abraham find the center better. Also as a right-handed golfer, this type of alignment is an indication that he is most likely right-eye dominant and uses the face of the putter to align to the target as much if not more than the flange line.
  • Just like Danny’s above, this putter is also shafted with the LA Golf Shaft OZIK TP — there must be something about that that has more players testing it out.
  • And finally, the grip is the SuperStroke Claw. Judging by the cleanliness of both these grips these are both new to the players and testing will prove what ends up come tournament time.

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Iron type for controlling shots into the wind?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from eckmanjp who is on the hunt for irons to help with controlling shots played into the wind. Our members give their opinions on what are the best options for eckmanjp, with plenty of different clubs and shafts recommended.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • driveandputtmachine: “Into the wind, spin is NOT your friend. No matter how low launching it will balloon. I was an extremely high spin player, in my search for something lower spinning my three best were…. TM P 790, Cobra Forged TEC, and Ping i500.The final piece is a shaft that spins high enough to hold greens, but not too high to balloon into the wind.”
  • mogc60: “Sounds like you have good clubs and shaft combo for reducing spin. Shafts do make a difference…but don’t cure the upshoot into the wind. Good advice above about more club and swinging slower…speed equals spin. I find the biggest mistake people make into the wind is playing the ball too far back and hitting down too hard. The key is smooth through impact and finishing low in your follow through…not pounding it down…that creates that upshooting shot that the wind destroys.”
  • dpb5031: “Technique plays the major role here, not equipment. Generally, anywhere from 1 to 3 extra club, grip down on the handle, and use what I call a wide-to-wide swing at 3/4 speed. Think limited arm swing (no longer than left arm parallel with the ground in BS) and then cover the ball, keep body turning through it, and finish wide & low, with handle following your rotating trunk around to the left.”
  • rxk9fan: “I think the head/shaft combo can make a huge difference of course along with how you deliver the clubhead into the ball. Take a look at the Titleist shaft chart and see what they are showing. FWIW though, the OP’s current shaft should not be a high launch/high spin shaft. I found both the 716 AP2 and CB to be tough to control spin with, but as suggested it was 100% my delivery at impact. I found the Srixon Z9xx series to spin less but the best thing I did was get to a quality teacher, and we improved a pretty tiny swing flaw that had a big impact on spin. Good luck. I can say I tried to “new club” my way through the spin problem, but three lessons is what it took to fix it.”

Entire Thread: “Iron type for controlling shots into the wind?”

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