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Mizuno MP-H5, MP-15 irons and MP-T5 wedges

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For decades, better players have fawned over Mizuno’s MP line of forged irons, while mid-to-high handicappers covered their eyes, but still looked through the creases in their fingers. The new MP-H5 and MP-15 irons still don’t invite high-handicappers to join the party, but the company improved their forgiveness while maintaining the looks, sound and feel that better players have come to expect from the clubs.

Related: Learn about Mizuno’s 2015 JPX irons

As for the new MP-T5 wedges, Mizuno has expanded its offering to include 25 different loft, bounce and grind combinations for both left and right-handed players. That puts Mizuno among the industry leaders in wedging offerings, making Mizuno’s latest wedge line a fit for a wider variety of players than ever.

MP-H5

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Mizuno’s MP-H5 irons are smaller, yet more-forgiving than the MP-H4 irons that they replace.

“MP” stands for “Mizuno Players,'” which means these clubs were created for the better players among the golfing population. According to Chuck Couch, vice president of product development at Mizuno, today’s golfers are bigger and stronger than ever, but golf courses are getting progressively more difficult as well. That had lead to many of those golfers opting for longer-flying, more forgiving irons to deal with the challenges of long courses, thicker rough and faster greens.

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Mizuno’s MP-H5 irons (left) and the MP-H4 irons they replace.

Last year’s MP-H4 line was designed as hittable irons for better players, placing them at the more-forgiving end of the MP spectrum. Despite the performance boost they received from their slightly larger size, Couch admitted that the irons were a bit too large for the player they were targeting.

“With the H4 irons, we hit a par 5 in two, but ended up making bogey,” Couch said. “We changed that with a pure-looking club and an understated design [in the H5].”

The MP-H5 irons have a topline that is considerably thinner than its predecessor, as well as a thinner sole that allows for better maneuverability through the turf. That gives them a more understated look than the MP-H4, but the new irons also have a higher moment of inertia (MOI) to produce better launch characteristics. How’d Mizuno do that?

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The MP-H5 irons (right) have considerably thinner top lines than last year’s MP-H4 irons. Impressively, the MP-H5 irons are actually more forgiving. 

As with previous Mizuno irons, the MP-H5 irons are made with the company’s Grain Flow forging process that improves the look and feel of the irons. Their 1770 maraging steel faces were able to be made thinner than their predecessors, however, saving engineers weight that could be redistributed around the perimeter of the club head to improve forgiveness. Additional forgiveness was added to the clubs with their hollow construction, which drives weight low and deep in the head to improve their launch conditions, particularly in the long irons.

Whereas the MP-H4 irons were a mixed set, with hollow long and mid irons and solid-faced short irons, the MP-H5 irons have an all-hollow construction that creates more consistency throughout the set.

MP-15

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The MP-15’s are the direct replacement for the company’s MP-59 irons, which were known for their workability, as well as their classic shape, look, sound and feel. The new MP-15’s maintain those characteristics and add 20 percent more forgiveness to the design.

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Mizuno’s MP-15 irons (left) and the MP-59 irons they replace.

With the MP-15’s, Mizuno engineers found a way to remove 38 grams of weight from the Grain Flow Forged irons — roughly 15 percent of their total weight — from their cavities, which is nearly double the weight the company was able to redistribute in the MP-59 irons. The weight was then added back to the irons in the form of a 7-gram titanium insert behind the impact area, which was blended with 3 grams of ABS polymer to improve feel. The rest of the weight was placed around the perimeter of the clubs to boost their MOI.

[quote_box_center]”We took everything that Luke and 1000 other tour players that we talked to liked about the MP-64 and Mp-59’s,” Couch said. “They feel the same as the 59’s, but we were way more strategic with our weight distribution to allow for a higher MOI. The pyramid shaped insert behind the hitting area allows for a larger sweet spot providing more forgiveness, without sacrificing the best qualities from the MP-64 or MP-59.”[/quote_box_center]

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At address, the MP-15 (right) and MP-59 irons are nearly identical, but the MP-15’s add 20 percent more forgiveness. 

Mizuno also used its Harmonic Impact Technology (H.I.T.), which measures feel and sound based on frequency and decibel-readings, to confirm that the MP-15’s closely replicated the feel of the company’s MP-64 irons, which are known as one of the best-feeling irons the company has produced in its history.

[quote_box_center]”There’s a difference between looking cool and being cool,” Couch said. “Although we spent a lot of time on cosmetics, we made a multi-material club head that maximized its discretionary weight … These irons are cool.”[/quote_box_center]

Both the MP-H5 and MP-15 irons will sell for $999 for an eight-piece set with a steel shafts ($1099 with graphite). The MP-H5 irons come stock with KBS Tour C-Taper Lite shafts, while the MP-15’s are sold with True Temper’s Dynamic Gold shafts.

Mizuno anticipates that better players will mix and match the long and mid irons from the MP-H5 line with the mid and short irons of the MP-15 line, so the company dropped the price of the MP-H5 irons by $100 to make it the same as the MP-15 irons and make it easier for them to do so.

According to Couch, it’s likely that Mizuno staff players Luke Donald and Charles Howell III will put a mix of the MP-H5 and the MP-15 in their bags after the Ryder Cup and FedEx Cup Playoffs.

The MP-H5 irons will be available in 1-PW, while the MP-15 irons will be available in 3-PW. They’ll be in stores on September 19 and available for presale August 29.

Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the MP-H5 and MP-15 irons, as well as the MP-T5 wedges in our forum.

MP-T5 Wedges

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To compete in today’s hypercompetitive wedge market, equipment companies have looked to offer the widest possible variety of grind, bounce and loft options so they can have a wedge that’s a perfect fit for each consumer. With its new MP-T5 wedges, Mizuno looked for a way to expand its wedge offerings without making the process of purchasing a wedge too confusing for consumers.

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[quote_box_center]”We took away that confusion by grinding the soles according to the bounce and loft of each wedge,” Couch said. “You don’t have to pick the grind and run the risk of mismatching the options because we did it for you.”[/quote_box_center]

The MP-T5 wedges are available in 25 different loft and bounce combinations, for both left and right-handed golfers, in lofts ranging from 49-to-62 degrees. The only choices you have to make is what loft you want, what bounce suits your game and what finish you desire, because Mizuno has already decided the grind and groove configuration depending on the choice you make.

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  • Low lofts: Mizuno’s MP-T5 gap wedges (49-to-53 degrees) have a classic C-grind with soft trailing edge relief. These wedges are mostly played from the fairway or rough using full swings, so golfers don’t need aggressive grinds, Couch said. These wedges also have the narrow, deep grooves that are designed to perform best on full shots.
  • Mid lofts: In the 54-to-58 degrees models, Mizuno gives golfers two different bounce options. Its low-bounce wedges have an aggressive C Grind for more versatility, while its high-bounce wedges have a soft trailing edge and a significant heel grind to aid performance on open-faced bunker shots. These wedges have wider, shallower grooves that perform better on open-faced shots around the green.
  • High lofts: Like the mid-lofted wedges, Mizuno’s MP-T5 high-lofted wedges (58-to-62 degrees) come in two options: high bounce and low bounce. The high-bounce wedges have an M Grind that stands for max bounce and max heel and toe relief, which helps prevent digging while still providing the versatility golfers need to hit delicate shots around the green. The lower-bounce models add more trailing edge relief and more grind on the heel. They also have wide, shallower grooves that add more touch around the greens.

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Below is a chart highlighting the specifications of Mizuno’s new MP-T5 wedges.

Screen Shot 2014-07-28 at 4.53.27 AM

The MP-T5 wedges are available in two finishes: Black Ion, which won’t rust with extended use, and White Satin. The wedges will sell for about $129.99 with True Temper’s Dynamic Gold Wedge shaft.

Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the MP-H5 and MP-15 irons, as well as the MP-T5 wedges in our forum.

 

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

30 Comments

30 Comments

  1. dabadass

    Nov 20, 2014 at 4:54 pm

    In the wedges it seems to me like there are only a few different heads and then they just bend them and slap a loft badge on the back.

  2. Jeff

    Nov 1, 2014 at 9:12 pm

    I was all set to make a sarcastic comment about how neat it is that an OEM finally found a way to move back the center of gravity in an iron.

    But then I saw those wedges, those things are gorgeous! Why do Mizuno staff players always use different wedges, those look great.

  3. Noahlevine2145

    Oct 11, 2014 at 7:20 pm

    how forgiving are the mp 15s though i am a 12 handicap and 13 years old should i get the 15s or the 850 forged? would prefer the 15

    • Jeff

      Nov 1, 2014 at 9:16 pm

      What do you like? If you like em and think they could make you enjoy the game that much more and you’ve got a way to buy them, get the ones you love. If you got the ones you just admitted you would rather not, every shot you ever hit that wasn’t arrow straight you’ll second guess. Go hit every iron on the market and buy the ones you love.

  4. jgpl001

    Sep 20, 2014 at 3:53 pm

    Very critical of the look of these when they first appeared here

    However, today I saw them and hit them and they are FANTASTIC

    Recently purchased 714 cb/mb mix, but now I am unsettled

    We’ll done Mizuno

  5. Eddy

    Aug 12, 2014 at 10:05 am

    I was really hoping that Mizuno would release a real pitching wedge with a 46 degree T5… Ah well…

  6. Jeff

    Aug 10, 2014 at 11:27 pm

    I bet anyone playing the M4’s isn’t thrilled to hear Mizuno refer to their irons as “ended up making a bogey”

  7. Eddie

    Aug 5, 2014 at 1:18 pm

    Those MP-H5s look much sleeker than the H4s. Very nice. Yet, does anyone have any info on them coming out with new JPX irons? Both EZs are hideous looking, the ugliest irons I’ve seen since the Ping G10s. And I am not thrilled with the JPX 825 Pros either. I am hoping they come up with new forged JPXs.

  8. Boris

    Aug 1, 2014 at 10:19 am

    Wow really like the mp15. But still prefer my mp 59 4,5,6 mp 4 7,8,9,pw

  9. Joseph

    Jul 30, 2014 at 1:36 pm

    Love all of the pics and both sets of new irons look really nice. If I could offer a suggestion, it would be really nice to know what club your looking at from the address position. Otherwise, you’re kind of guessing.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Jul 30, 2014 at 2:25 pm

      Joseph,

      If you view the thread in the forums, it’s much easier to tell exactly what club you’re viewing. We’re currently working on a fix for our front-page software that will make it easier to see what clubs you’re viewing as well.

      Thanks for reading.

  10. Sven Hallauer

    Jul 30, 2014 at 11:54 am

    Very exciting to see the MP-15 irons, definitely have to check them out for next season. Also great to see that Mizuno finally offers a 62-degree wedge, this might finally get me away from using my old Titleist wedge.

    As to the MP-H5, I was a fan of the Fli-Hi but hated the MP-H4 – so not sure if I should give this line another try or not.

  11. joselo

    Jul 30, 2014 at 11:13 am

    MPH5’s look a lot like the new nike’s protos… only 10,000 times better!

  12. Rich

    Jul 30, 2014 at 8:42 am

    Wow, so many loft options in the wedges. Different grinds too. Awesome!

  13. steve

    Jul 30, 2014 at 8:27 am

    Not Mizuno’s best work from a visual standpoint

  14. Christian

    Jul 29, 2014 at 7:49 pm

    Sept 21st, plenty of time to replace the spinners for s300’s please!

    • Christian

      Jul 29, 2014 at 7:50 pm

      Edit: nvm, in the video they have spinners.

  15. Ryan

    Jul 29, 2014 at 4:38 pm

    The look of the irons at address is what matters. Not ” badging “…

  16. jgpl001

    Jul 29, 2014 at 4:27 pm

    What’s happening with the mp r 12 wedge?

    Is it being replaced also or is Mizuno just going with one new wedge?

  17. Charlie

    Jul 29, 2014 at 12:54 pm

    Release date anyone?

  18. Chris

    Jul 29, 2014 at 12:26 pm

    I’m hoping they will offer the MP-H5 in a 2 iron. Also, as someone in a retail store, it’s nice to see the different loft options on the wedges to get a better gapping between today’s irons.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Jul 29, 2014 at 1:37 pm

      Yes, 1-PW.

      • Chris

        Jul 30, 2014 at 5:07 pm

        Awesome! Haven’t had a chance to talk to our rep about them yet, but having the 1 and 2 irons in those would be nice!

  19. Jordan

    Jul 29, 2014 at 12:08 pm

    I would be surprised if Luke actually switched to the 15’s or T5’s. I think the mp 59’s look way better. The badging looks less pronounced and just flows better with the rest of the cavity on the 59’s.

    • Tom

      Aug 28, 2014 at 9:03 pm

      Couldn’t agree less, love the new design – might make me change from my Mp62s at last!

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Equipment

Puma unveil new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

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Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

Puma Golf has launched its new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear – a new version of the NXT with premium leather accents.

The upper of the shoe features a premium leather saddle wrapped around Pwrframe reinforcement. The Pwrframe TPU is an ultra-thin frame that is placed in high-stress areas of the upper for lightweight in a bid to offer added support and increased stability.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The new additions feature Puma’s Pro-Form TPU outsole with an organically-altered traction pattern, containing over 100 strategically placed directional hexagon lugs in proper zones, designed to provide maximum stability and traction.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The Ignite NXT Crafted footwear contain a full-length IGNITE Foam midsole, wrapped in Soleshield in design to offer maximum durability, comfort and energy return. Soleshield is a micro-thin TPU film that is vacuum-formed around the midsole designed to make cleaning off dirt and debris effortless.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

Speaking on the new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear, Andrew Lawson, PLM Footwear, Puma Golf said

“The Ignite NXT Crafted perfectly fuse the beauty of handcrafted shoemaking with modern development techniques to deliver optimum elegance and peak performance. With the combination of style and performance these shoes will appeal to a wide variety of golfers – those who appreciate the classic look of a leather saddle shoe and those who value modern comfort and stability technologies being a part of their game.”

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The Ignite NXT Crafted shoes are available in 4 colorways: White-Leather Brown-Team Gold, Black-Leather Brown-Team Gold, Peacoat-Leather Brown-Team Gold and White-Hi-Rise-Team Gold) and come in sizes 7-15.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The shoes cost $140 per pair and are available online and at retail beginning today, June 5, 2020.

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What GolfWRXers are saying about the best Nike driver ever

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@ukgolfclubsales

In our forums, our members have been discussing Nike drivers. WRXer ‘DixieD’ is currently building up a Nike bag and has reached out to fellow members for driver advice, and WRXers have been sharing what they feel is the best Nike driver ever made.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Ger21: “VR Pro LE? I have two I was still playing last year.”
  • mahonie: “The STR8-Fit Tour was one of the best drivers I’ve played. Still have it the garage and take it to the range occasionally…it would possibly still be in the bag if it hadn’t developed a ‘click’ in the head which I cannot fix. Long, straight(ish) and nice sound.”
  • jackr189: “The VR_S is one of the best.”
  • Finaus_Umbrella: “I played the Vapor Fly Pro, and still do on occasion for nostalgia sake. Sound and feel are great, but it demands a good strike.”
  • PowderedToastMan: “I enjoyed the SQ Tour back in the day, the one Tiger used forever. Do I miss it? Not at all, but it was a pretty good club for its time.”

Entire Thread: “Best Nike driver?”

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What GolfWRXers are saying about driving irons for mid-handicappers

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In our forums, our members have been discussing whether mid-handicappers can benefit from a driving iron. WRXer ‘jomatty’ says:

“I average about 230 off the tee on good drives. I can get a little more sometimes, but 230 is probably the average. I’m 42 years old and shoot in the mid to low 80’s. I do not get along with fairway woods very well, especially off the tee, and really don’t get enough extra length over my hybrid to consider using it aside from very rare situations on par 5’s (I’ve considered just going from driver to 19-degree hybrid and getting an extra wedge or something).”…

…and wants to know if he would be better served by a driving iron. Our members have been sharing their thoughts and suggestions.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • MtlJeff: “If you can shoot mid 80’s, you probably hit it well enough to hit a bunch of different clubs. Personally, I think hybrids are easier to hit….but some driving irons are quite forgiving. I use a G400 crossover that is very easy to hit and looks more iron-like. Something like that you might like. Be careful with some of them though because they aren’t always super forgiving, so you’d have to hit them first.”
  • HackerD: “G410 crossover is my version of a driving iron, feel like I hit it straighter than a hybrid. Just as easy to hit as a hybrid.”
  • hanginnwangin: “I shoot in the low 80s normally and in the 70s on my really good days. I have probably around the same or similar swing speed as you. I have been hitting my 4 iron off the tee on tight holes, and it’s been working pretty well so far. I hit it about 190-220. I have a 4 hybrid but just can’t hit it as consistently as the 4 iron, and it doesn’t even go much farther. I have a 5 wood which I only use for 220+ yard par 3s or wide-open fairways. Basically, it’s all personal preference and what you do best with. Everyone is going to be different. Try new stuff out and see what works. But if irons are the strongest part of your game (they are for me as well), I would give the 4 iron a shot. You can get a lot of roll out on the tee shots with it,”
  • Hellstrom: “Don’t laugh, but I bought a 17* hybrid with a senior flex shaft at a garage sale for $5, and I can hit it nice and easy and keep it in play without losing any distance. My driver SS is between 105 and 110 usually and swinging this thing feels like swinging a spaghetti noodle, but it works. I don’t have it in the bag all the time, but I do use it for certain courses. I take my 6 iron out and throw that in, so if I struggle with getting the ball off the tee, I just go to that.”

Entire Thread: “Driving iron for a mid-handicapper”

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