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Wilson Staff reintroduces its classic 8802 putter

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The putter that has won more majors than any other is back. To celebrate its 100th anniversary as a company, Wilson Staff is reintroducing the classic 8802 putter.

Although Wilson used the 8802 moniker earlier, the putter essentially came into being with the “Designed by Arnold Palmer” in 1962. When Palmer left Wilson in 1963, the putter was renamed “The Wilson 8802.” For the next 50 years, the 8802 found its way into the bags of the top players of the world, including Ben Crenshaw, Greg Norman and Phil Mickelson, and it has been a favorite of amateur golfers around the world.

Some 50 years later after its original introduction, Wilson is bringing a new milled 8802 putter to market. And as you can see, it’s a beauty.

WSSofter

Screen-shot-2014-06-30-at-4.45.05-PM

Made from 304 stainless steel and featuring the traditional 8802 heel-shafted design, the putter is equipped with a double milled face and a 335-gram head as well as stamping consistent with the original 8802.

A steepless True Temper Head Speed shaft and Lamkin 3GEN pistol grip are standard on the new 8802.

The new 8802 comes with a red and white putter cover that is at once bold and classic, which you can see below. The putter is presently available in only a right-handed model at one length: 35 inches and retails for $179.99.

Screen-shot-2014-06-30-at-4.44.54-PM

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39 Comments

39 Comments

  1. stephenf

    Oct 24, 2016 at 9:41 am

    Very nice views, Wilson. If you’re going to look at the putter from on the ground up the line, on the ground down the line, or on the ground from behind the heel of the putter, this will give a player a really good idea of what it’s like.

    I don’t know why people prefer the Jetsons putters. None of them have the feel you can get by hitting a good forged putter on the sweet spot. They just dampen the feel of bad strikes. It’s not that hard to hit the sweet spot of a putter anyway, which makes it even more inexplicable to me why any pro would use them. If you can’t line up a simple, clean blade and hit the sweet spot at putter speed, maybe you need to go work at it until you can. Then work on hitting the sweet spot on chips and pitches, and work back. Watch what it does for your game.

  2. hells no

    May 11, 2015 at 12:10 pm

    For all of those looking to make the game of golf harder.

    • stephenf

      Oct 24, 2016 at 9:33 am

      For all those who have the minimal skill it takes to hit a putter on the sweet spot.

  3. VoteOutIncumbents

    Apr 19, 2015 at 11:02 am

    I bought this putter and used it for the first time last week. I remember as a kid my first putter was a blade…I remember (I think, it’s been forty years) being a better putter back then. So I went back to the future with this new blade. On my first hole I made a twenty footer…haven’t done THAT in a while. Made another long one later in the round. It takes a little getting used to because it requires an arc swing that you have to “feel”. So far (one round) I love it!

  4. Mike

    Mar 29, 2015 at 7:56 pm

    Have The Gentle Ben Walter Hagen 8802. Beautiful putter.

  5. KyleB13

    Mar 11, 2015 at 12:00 pm

    Got one and it is super smooth and so good looking! Makes you think of putting as an art, not a mental science with alignments, MOI, colors, shapes, arcs, etc. Hopefully I can just roll it half as good as Crenshaw, Palmer, Nicklaus and we’ll be doing good!

  6. Pingback: Want! | A Scottish world of golf

  7. Ponjo

    Jan 2, 2015 at 5:20 pm

    Just purchased this putter in a 33″ length. The roll is magnificent. Big credit for Wilson turning my order round in 3 days via my Golf Pro.

  8. mario francolini

    Oct 14, 2014 at 4:49 am

    hi we make a similar putter here in England which is Forged in the Black Country (where the Titanic Chains Were made) and we hand finish them in Warwickshire William Shakespeare country, we make them in two materials 303 stainless and a silicone bronze, if anybody would like to see them i can send some pictures of our work

    • Brian Conley

      Mar 14, 2015 at 11:23 am

      Please send me some information.
      Thanks, Brian

    • Steve Bilbrough

      Jul 29, 2015 at 7:03 pm

      Would be interested to see your 8802 style putters in 303 stainless and silicone bronze. Pl;ease send pico’s and pricing.

      Thank you … Steve

    • stephenf

      Oct 24, 2016 at 9:34 am

      send send send send SEND

  9. M.

    Aug 24, 2014 at 9:47 pm

    Let Tiger have his fun with the stack and tilt bandits, and when his done I’m sure we’ll see him over at the dirt doing the twirl with Elk

  10. tom

    Aug 14, 2014 at 2:08 am

    Have the early 8802, the reissue and the Palmer model. I have used them for years. I really like the reissue but I got to say I like the look of the new one. I swore I was quitting buying the putters but I should never say never! Shouldn’t you put your money into the club you use the most?

  11. LeoLeo

    Jul 25, 2014 at 9:59 pm

    I have the “Original” Wilson 8802 which was obviously not the original that I bought around 1982. It has a dull pickle finish no the shine of the original. It’s so simple compared to all the space ship shaped putters out today.

  12. Shallowface

    Jul 25, 2014 at 8:13 am

    Love the direction in which Wilson is heading!

  13. luc van heirweghe

    Jul 14, 2014 at 10:20 am

    Dear Sir/Madam,

    I’m particularly interested in buying a Wilson Staff 8802 – putter but cannot find a stie on which to buy one. Can you offer any assistance ?

    • Jeff S

      Jul 14, 2014 at 9:24 pm

      You can buy one directly from the Wilson website.

    • stephenf

      Oct 24, 2016 at 9:35 am

      Also give the Palmer or Old Master replicas a look.

  14. bobbycj

    Jul 11, 2014 at 11:25 pm

    I’ve played the 8882 blk for the past few years. I think the head is fairly heavy (350 gm), I love it, very consistent roll, I like the milled grooves. Have a Winn pistol grip (oversized) on it. I saw a new 8882 the other day in the shop for $79. I think $179 for a 8802 is steep unless you get it just for nostalgia…if that’s the case get an original on ebay for $40. If you’re getting it to actually make putts just get the 8882. Or, just get it to look like a big shot on the practice green. I can’t say enough good things about the 8882 blk. I like the Napa toe hang style putter and hit one whenever I can to see how it compares against the 8882 blk. I’ve yet to find one better

  15. Jack

    Jul 9, 2014 at 4:29 pm

    Bettinardi made a blade similar to the 8802. I have it my bag. It’s the real deal.
    This particular is no longer in production. If you find one buy it.

  16. Mike Webber

    Jul 3, 2014 at 3:48 pm

    I think the original Wilson putter was made of a heavier metal, which I believe was Pot Metal. Unlike today’s version of stainless steel, which has a livelier face upon contact, the heavier putter was referred to as being almost dead. That means you hit the ball as far as you wanted it to go. To me that’s a step ahead of today’s blended metals in which their is a measured amount of guess work. While I’m at it, I also have to give me regard to the Staff Irons of the mid 60’s through 1971. I still play the button backs.

    • David Findla

      Jul 10, 2014 at 1:54 pm

      I was told many years ago that the original 8802 was made of metal from scrapped WWII warships.

    • Joe Duffer

      Jul 23, 2014 at 12:41 pm

      The original Wilson Palmer and 8802 putters were made from 1030 carbon steel.

    • Truth Hurts

      Mar 16, 2015 at 11:06 am

      The amount of nonsense in the world of Golf regarding Putters reminds one of the alchemy of the Middle Ages.

  17. Grant

    Jul 3, 2014 at 11:10 am

    My 1970’s model 8802 is looking at me from the bag
    Best feeling putter ever. Ihave some old green shafted Ironmaster’s that also feel good. Never have any doubt whenIuse the 8802.

  18. Pingback: Wilson Staff reintroduces its classic 8802 putter | Spacetimeandi.com

  19. Neil Cooney

    Jul 2, 2014 at 6:35 am

    What Retail outlets in Ireland can new “retro” putter be bought through ??

  20. tlmck

    Jul 2, 2014 at 3:34 am

    I wish they would remake the old “Flag Hi”. Basically the same as 8802 except for less flange. More solid hit as well. Mine is has decades of bag chatter, but is still gameable.

  21. Boo

    Jul 1, 2014 at 11:48 pm

    The putter head is just too light at 335 grams. Wish they could make it more in the 350 plus range!

  22. Mike

    Jul 1, 2014 at 10:18 pm

    Originally was made from pot metal not stainless steel

    • Joe Duffer

      Jul 23, 2014 at 12:44 pm

      Wrong… they were made from 1030 carbon steel.

  23. Cwolf

    Jul 1, 2014 at 3:51 pm

    Buttah

  24. Chuck

    Jul 1, 2014 at 1:45 pm

    Ummm, somebody please correct me if I am wrong. But the classic Wilson Head Speed shaft was a STEPPED shaft.

    So if Wilson is selling a shaft that is stepless, but is calling it (as is no doubt their proprietary right) “Head Speed”, it is something else entirely, right?

    Wilson has made lots and lots of 8802 variants and reissues over the years. I would have thought that the modern challenge would have been to absolutely faithfully re-create the orignal “Designed by Arnold Palmer.”

    • I

      Jul 2, 2014 at 3:40 am

      Inane comment

    • Bill Morrell

      Jul 3, 2014 at 1:53 pm

      I have owned three original (1964) 8802’s and one Designed By. All had 5 step shafts with green shaft bands. Why Wilson wouldn’t use this in their “tribute ” putter is baffling at best.

  25. Reid

    Jul 1, 2014 at 1:31 pm

    I’ve loved every past model including the original and still have a ton in my collection. This is a definitely must add for me!

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Whats in the Bag

Andrew Landry’s winning WITB: The American Express 2020

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Driver: Ping G410 LST (10.5 degrees, neutral setting)
Shaft: Aldila Tour Blue 65 TX (tipped 1″, 45.25″)

3-wood: TaylorMade M5 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow

5-wood: Ping G (set at 17.75)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow 85-6.5 (42″)

7-wood: Ping G410 (set at 20.5 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow 83-6.5 (41″, tipped 2″)

Irons: Ping iBlade (4-PW)
Shafts: Nippon Modus3 105-X

Wedges: Ping Glide 3.0 (46 bent to 45), Titleist Vokey Design SM8 (54, 60 degrees)
Shafts: Nippon Modus3 Tour 105-X

Putter: Ping Vault 2.0 ZB Stealth (33″, 22° lie, 3° loft)
Grip: PP58 Full Cord Standard

Grips: Lamkin Crossline Full Cord 58R

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Whats in the Bag

Lee Westwood’s winning WITB: 2020 Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship

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Driver: Ping G410 Plus (10.5 degrees at 10 degrees, neutral)
Shaft: Aldila NV 2KXV Green 65 X (tipped 1/2 inch)

3-wood: Ping G410 (14.5 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila NV 2KXV Green

Hybrid: Ping G410 (19 degrees at 19.7)
Shaft: Aldila Tour Green Hybrid 85 X (40.5 inches)

Driving iron: Ping G Crossover (2)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff

Irons: Ping i210 (4-UW)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff w/Cushin stepped 1 strong

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged (60 degrees)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff w/Cushin, stepped 1 strong

Putter: Ping Sigma 2 Fetch

Grips: Lamkin Crossline Full Cord 58 Rib (+2 wraps) on woods, Ping ID8 White 1/2 Cord (+2 wraps) on irons

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

 

Additional specs on Ping.com

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Equipment

From a Fitter: Everything you need to know about wedge shafts

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This is such a dark corner of the golf industry that I truly believe needs a lot of work. Hopefully, this article can shed some light on wedge shafts for you.

I will mention some standards, explain some of my experience, and hopefully, help you make some good choices.

Linking back to the first article on aspects of a wedge that I target when fitting, I place a lot of weight on the style, bounce, grind, and loft/lie/length to get my wedge fitting started. As we move into shaft options, I look at crossing T’s and dotting I’s to ensure a player enjoys their new wedge setup.

We carry a bunch of shaft options built into different heads. As yet we do not have a consistent way to swap shafts in wedges during a session that still allows them to play at a reasonable swing weight and perform as we would like. Moving forward, I will be looking to explore this area to see if we can deliver better service and experience.

Generic standards for wedge shaft setup

  • Dynamic Gold “wedge flex”
  • Matching exactly the same shaft in your irons to your wedges
  • A slightly heavier shaft in your wedges
  • Putting an 8-iron shaft in your wedges
  • Using a wedge-specific shaft

During an iron fitting, we see a lot of variables in flight and feel, this is mainly because we use 6-irons as our demo clubs. When clients are hitting 6-iron shots, they are often looking for max carry, flight, and shot-shaping ability. This leads to hitting a lot of full swings and placing the shaft under a decent amount of load, therefore, we see some notable changes when we swap shafts. This will not show up as drastically in wedges as we are not always trying to hit the full shot. 

As we get into wedge fitting, I discuss with my clients in-depth what they use each wedge for, how far they hit them, what is the most common shot they play, what are the most common bad shots, how does the ball react on the green and what shots do they feel they need in the bag. Basically, trying to get a good overview of their game in a short period. In very few cases do players mention the ‘full shot’ lets them down? Often players say they are more comfortable hitting “softer shots” or 3/4 swings, this gives them the flight/shot that they require on a regular basis and the niche shots and consistency lets them down.

Logic here says to me, you probably do not want exactly the same shaft in the irons all the way down to the lob wedge when you are hitting soft shots 95 percent of the time. When I look at shaft specs, I am trying to build a shaft that can easily put up with the stress of a full shot and handle a softer shot without feeling blunt (for all clubs in the bag).

When I merge this process into wedges, the only wedge a “matching iron” shaft seems to be applicable (for the majority) is the gap wedge or the wedge that is predominantly a full-swing club. This is the club you hit full and maybe knock-down shots with, but you’re rarely trying to hit “flicky” spinning shots. (Those shots are why you also have a sand and/or lob wedge in the bag).

It would then make sense that if you are rarely hitting any full shots with your sand wedge or lob wedge, you probably want a softer golf shaft in those (as they are not trying to put up with your “flat out” swing), still ensuring the shaft does not feel ‘blunt’ or hard work to play around the greens with.

This is not a one size fits all theory, but I think a lot of players would have success even thinking about their wedge shaft layout in this way.

As an example: Personally, I am playing True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue 120g X100 flex iron shafts. I hit a lot of full shots with my 50 and 54, so I have chosen to play the DG 120TI X100 shaft exactly the same way in those two clubs. My 60-degree however, I rarely hit the full shot, so I feel need it a little softer in stiffness, but I need the weight to get my tempo correct and to give me more control to hit lower shots. For this club, I play the Dynamic Gold S400 Tour Issue. I chose this shaft as the profile is very close to my iron shaft but it is 13g heavier and has a slightly softer tip section, which I feel gives me a little better response.

Please see the S3 shaft profile comparison below

(I am very lucky to have the S3 shaft data, it gives me an apples-to-apples comparison of shaft profiles and weights and make wedge shaft selection a lot easier).

I also wanted to capture some data to highlight the difference wedge shafts have as simply as possible. Below is a graph showing a PGA pro’s shot grouping with a few shaft options. His 6-iron speed is about 94mph, and he has a sharp back-swing to down-swing ratio. This would put him at the quick end of people I fit. This generally means the player enjoys stiffer shafts, stiff style profiles, high swingweight, high total/shaft weight (and again not in all cases).

He tested three shafts all in the same wedge head, with the same length, loft, and lie.

Please see the grouping below

The three shafts tested were: Nippon Modus 105 Wedge specific, Dynamic Gold Wedge flex and Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400.

In no way am I trying to demonstrate the DG S400 is the best shaft for wedges, but in this group of data all that shows up is, the stiffest profile, heaviest shaft (of the test group) gave the player the tightest grouping for his 55-degree wedge shot. His explanation was that he felt the club’s position in the swing better and the strike through the turf was much more consistent, producing more consistent land zones with the DG S400. This small test shows that the wedge shaft alone has an impact even for a skilled golfer.

There are however always exceptions to theories (especially in golf!)

When I have a player using, for example, C-Taper 130 X or Dynamic Gold X100 in their irons it is tough to find a profile that matches closely that is heavier and not any stiffer. In these cases, I tend to have them play the same shaft all the way down to their LW, but I try to increase swing weight and decrease FM in the niche shot wedges (SW and LW). This can just mean adding head weight to soften the shaft a little, or sometimes soft-stepping the product to get some ‘feel’ back. 

The key take-away points

  • Think about the shots you play with your wedges most and how hard you hit them
  • Think about linking your shafts to your irons, but they do not always have to match
  • Test options and measure: grouping, turf interaction and flight consistency
  • Try and break down if the ‘”feel” of stiffness or weight help or hinder you making a consistent swing/strike
  • Don’t just settle with the shaft the wedges come with… unless they match in with your setup!

Getting all the information in one article is always tough, and I hate generalizing, so feel free to shoot me some questions—I like to try to help and also hear your experience and ideas when I can!

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