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Editor Review: Mitsubishi Diamana W-Series Shaft

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Pros: Mitsubishi’s Diamana W-Series has similar launch and spin characteristics to its predecessor, the ‘ahina. Its newly designed butt section that gives the shaft a smoother feel, and it’s is the first White Board shaft to be available in a 50-gram model.

Cons: Its $400 price tag will be a turn off to many golfers, but that’s what it takes to own a Diamana shaft.

Bottom Line: Most White Board customers are looking to reduce spin, making Mitsubishi’s decision to give the 3rd-generation White Board a slightly softer tip a little confusing. But we’re never going to knock a company for offering golfers a wider variety of premium aftermarket shaft options.

Overview

Mitsubishi Rayon is known to many golfers as the maker of some of the best shafts money can buy. Sure, the abundant usage of Mitsubishi’s shafts on the PGA Tour by golfers such as Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, Rory McIlroy and Zach Johnson has helped its reputation. But industry insiders also know that Mitsubishi Rayon’s parent company, Mitsubishi Chemical, makes the high-quality carbon fiber materials used not just for Mitsubishi shafts, but for several of its competitors as well.

Mitsubishi Rayon’s Diamana W-Series shaft is the third-generation of the company’s popular “White Board” shaft, which is used by many players who desire a premium-constructed shaft with low-launch, low-spin characteristics.

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The main difference between the W-Series and its predecessor, the ‘ahina, is the shaft’s stiffer butt section. That section of the shaft is reinforced with Mitsubishi’s Dialed material (also called “pitch fiber”), which is twice as strong as traditional shaft materials. The shaft also has a slightly softer tip section, giving it a more balanced overall feel than the stiff-tip ‘ahina. According to Mitsubishi, the stronger, stiffer butt section of the W-Series allows for more energy transfer, acting as a stronger “spring” as golfers approach impact.

Screen Shot 2013-10-05 at 5.58.26 PMScreen Shot 2013-10-05 at 5.59.16 PM

In the EI Charts above, notice how the W-Series (black line, left graph) has a stiffer butt section and a slightly softer tip section than the ‘ahina (green line, right graph). The mid-section of the W-Series shaft is also noticeably softer, providing a more balanced feel. 

The W-Series (MSRP $400) are also the first line of White Board shafts to be available in a 50-gram model, following the industry trend of offering light weight shaft options.

Screen Shot 2013-09-26 at 1.51.34 PM

Performance

We tested a 60S W-Series shaft against a 60S ‘ahina, cut to the same 45-inch length in a Nike Covert Tour driver head set to 8.5N. All three testers had high swing speeds, with a range of 105-to-116 mph on golf radar. With the W-Series shaft, the testers averaged a launch of 14.05 degrees, with 2603 rpms of spin. With the ‘ahina, the launch was actually slightly higher, 14.2 degrees, with slightly less spin, 2590 rpm.

The golfers also swung the ‘ahina slightly faster than the W-Series, averaging 111.1 mph with the ‘ahina and 110 mph with the W-Series.

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So what do those numbers mean? Basically, the performance differences between the shafts are too close to call. Golfers are more likely choose one shaft over another based on feel rather than performance differences. Changing driver heads and/or a driver’s settings will be much more impactful to launch monitor numbers than changing from the ‘ahina to the W-Series and vice versa.

Looks and Feel

Two of the three testers commented that the ‘ahina felt “more stable” to them than the W-Series, largely due to its stiffer mid and tip sections. But it should be noted that those golfers had the two quickest tempos. The tester with the slower tempo commented that the W-Series shaft felt “smoother” and “more balanced” than the ‘ahina.

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Like all of Mitsubishi’s Diamana White Board shafts, the W-Series features Mitsubishi’s classic white oval logo, as well as the company’s beloved “flower band” graphics. One of the testers commented that the W-Series shaft may have looked even better with the matte finish used for Mitsubishi’s Diamana D+ shafts, however, the overall feedback on the looks of the shaft was positive.

The Takeaway

Golfers in the “White Board” category are often looking for the lowest-spinning, smoothest-feeling shaft they can get their hands on. While the W-Series hits the mark for smoothness, Mitsubishi’s decision to give the shaft slightly more spin than the ‘ahina caused some concern.

According to Mitsubishi, the reason the W-Series was designed to offer slightly more spin has to do with the current trend of ultra low-spinning driver heads in the marketplace, which will no doubt continue in 2014 and beyond. Given that fact, the W-Series could be a winner for a lot of aftermarket shaft fittings in 2014.

We’re not sure the subtle differences between the W-Series and the ‘ahina are enough to drive golfers to spend $400 for an upgrade, but the shaft is a solid pairing with the company’s higher-launching, higher-spinning Diamana B-Series shaft. Like the W-Series, the B-Series uses pitch fibers to offer improved feel and the performance golfers expect from the company’s popular “Blue Board” family of shafts.

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Above: Tianlang Guan plays a Mitsubishi Diamana B-Series (Japanese version) shaft in his Callaway X Hot 4 wood.

We applaud Mitsubishi for giving golfers more high-end aftermarket shaft options, but we’re just not sure that many gearheads will be excited about a White Board with a softer tip. However, that could change if 2014’s crop of drivers prove to be as low spinning as major OEM officials have indicated.

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9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Pingback: Callaway Golf Mitsubishi Diamana White

  2. Johan

    Nov 8, 2013 at 10:52 am

    I have the B-series 70X in my driver swinging around 115 – 117mph and love the results.
    The faster swingers in this test should really try a stiffer and/or heavier shaft if they are complaining about the shaft not beeing stable enough. If the shaft doesn’t fit your swing it doesn’t matter if it’s a 60 or 400$ shaft.

    Now I’m just pondering if I should put a 80X W- or B-series in my spoon 🙂

  3. jay

    Oct 16, 2013 at 12:32 am

    grab a pull on ebay or here for around $100. I have the original BB’s in my driver and 3w and I love em

  4. glenn kirk

    Oct 12, 2013 at 4:51 am

    diamana

  5. glenn kirk

    Oct 12, 2013 at 4:50 am

    sorry meant diamond

  6. glenn kirk

    Oct 12, 2013 at 4:49 am

    shaft is everything stock shafts are junk diamond after market shafts are awesome

  7. Dolph Lundgrenade

    Oct 10, 2013 at 5:19 am

    Save yourself $400 and just practice more often.

  8. BenDover

    Oct 7, 2013 at 5:13 pm

    save yourself $340 and get an x-caliber tour shaft for $60

    • paul

      Oct 7, 2013 at 8:52 pm

      Really? Is the x caliber actually that good? I tried the ahina 70 (ish) gram shaft and loved it. felt so good.

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Apparel Reviews

Brooks Koepka’s Winning Outfit: 2018 U.S. Open

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Brooks Koepka played like he dressed on Sunday at Shinnecock Hills for the final round of the U.S. Open; his outfit was athletic, well put together, boring with a bit of flash (those shoes!!), and most importantly, it got the job done.

See the golf clubs and shafts Brooks used to win.

A great representative of the new age of golf, Koepka has the frame of a baseball player, and he’s not afraid to accentuate it with tight-fitting polos and an athletic look. For Sunday, he chose a white-on-gray-on-gray look that was understated, but clean — just like his scorecard. He really made the Nike Golf Tour Premiere PE shoes, with hits of electric orange, the star. Check out the details on his full outfit below.

Brooks Koepka’s Winning Outfit

  • Hat: Nike AeroBill Classic99
  • Shirt: Nike Zonal Cooling polo
  • Belt: Nike Stretch Woven
  • Pants: Nike Flex
  • Shoes: Nike Golf Tour Premiere PE
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Apparel Reviews

Dustin Johnson’s Winning Outfit: 2018 FedEx St. Jude Classic

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Dustin Johnson won the 2018 FedEx St. Jude Classic by 6 shots — and he holed out on the 72nd hole for eagle as the cherry on top.

You can check out the clubs he used to win here, but this article is all about his outfit.

Per usual, DJ went with the white-on-navy-on-navy-navy look that he wears often, especially on winning Sundays. Also, according to Adidas, it’s the first time that a Primeknit shoe has won on the PGA Tour, so there’s that.

Let’s dive into his full outfit…

Dustin’s Winning Outfit

  • Hat: TaylorMade New Era Tour 9Fifty (White)
  • Polo: Ultimate365 Heather Polo (Collegiate Navy)
  • Belt: 3-Stripes Perforated Reversible
  • Pants: Ultimate365 Flat Front (Navy)
  • Shoes: Tour 360Knit (Grey/Real Purple)
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Apparel Reviews

Modern classics: Catching up with Holderness & Bourne

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If you haven’t heard of Holderness & Bourne, well, for one thing, you’ve missed a couple of our gift guides. We’ve lauded the Rye, New York-based apparel manufacturer on more than one occasion for making some of the best polos in the business.

H&B, not surprisingly the product of two men named (Alex) Holderness and (John) Bourne, is quickly establishing a reputation for classic styles in tailored fits using modern materials. In addition to both performance and cotton polos, Holderness & Bourne makes sweaters, vests, bags, and other accessories.

I spoke with Alex Holderness about the company’s growth and what’s next.

BA: We first spoke a couple of years ago, but things have really taken off since then. Tell me about the growth.

AH: It’s been a great few years for us. We’ve basically tripled the past few years. We’re now stocking more than 150 clubs around the country and some great clubs abroad as well. We’re seeing traction for the brand; we’re seeing momentum. A lot of people like the concept of the brand, which is classic style with a more modern approach to fabrics and fit…and it’s working, so we’re trying to grow carefully based on that.

BA: What did establishing traction look like for you?

AH: It’s been steady all along. There wasn’t a point where the tide turned and things started to get good when they weren’t good before. But it is tough to get traction in green grass, and we feel very fortunate that we were based in New York…early in the history of the brand, we landed Winged Foot…Greenwich Country Club and a few others in the area really early on…So we were very lucky…because traction in green grass for brands like us is driven by perception, so if you can align yourself as a brand with the better clubs and public facilities around the country it can be very favorable. A lot of times, it results in people…calling us, because they’ve heard it [our apparel] did very well at Winged Foot or some other club. So that’s our general approach to green grass.

We’re not snobs about it by any means. It’s not like we have some grand strategy to only stock the top 100 clubs. But we care a lot about making premium products and being a premium brand. As a results of that, we are a natural fit for higher-end facilities, whether they’re public or private. We’re not going to ever be the cheapest brand in the shop, and we’re not going to be on clearance for 70 percent off…we’re very careful about what we’re building, and as a result of that, having these relationships with facilities around the country has been really helpful for us…and it’s helped us generate momentum in terms of getting inbound inquiries.

But it has taken a while. We’re four years into this thing, and it’s a day-by-day, year-by-year process..It’s not like we went out and raised $5 million in investor capital. We didn’t go out and try to be an overnight success…and get into every club. We only raised a small amount of capital, and we’re trying to kind of bootstrap: make great product, sell it, then use those proceeds to broaden our assortment. We want to add additional categories and get into more clubs every year, but it takes time.

BA: Can you talk a bit about your core consumer and how you’re appealing to him in ways that maybe other brands weren’t?

AH: My business partner John and I are both guys in our late 30s, married with kids and all that, but young enough to want a cleaner, more modern fit without sacrificing the classic look. We just knew that the combination of fit and style that we had in mind would resonate with plenty of guys, because we started out looking at this whole thing from the customer’s perspective. We also wanted to put some real soul into the brand, creating something very authentic within golf, because we didn’t always feel we were getting that as customers buying golf apparel in the past.

BA: Can you talk a little bit about the balance between e-commerce sales and green grass?

AH: Green grass has been the focus for us so far, but it’s a nice overall split. I think these days any relatively new brand needs to have a website where their customers can reach them directly, but for us the relationships we have with the clubs and public facilities that stock our brand are certainly just as important. Those places are the real stewards of the game and golf culture, and our brand has proven to be a strong fit for them.

BA: You’ve been pretty selective in your marketing and messaging…can you talk about that?

AH: We’re just kind of old school about it. We don’t care to shout about the brand or pay a bunch of money for marketing and PR. Our thinking has always been that if we focus on designing and manufacturing excellent products and get them into the right people’s hands, the brand will grow nicely as people tell their friends about the brand. We also put a huge emphasis on customer service for that same reason. We want people to have an excellent experience with us, even if that involves solving a problem for them, and that approach has been a good one so far.

BA: Talk about Roberto Castro wearing your wares, as it were…

AH: We are really proud to have Roberto onboard as a brand ambassador, and he’s become a great friend of ours as well. He found out about us a couple years ago by reading a piece about new golf brands on the blog Red Clay Soul, and reached out. We weren’t looking to sponsor tour players, but we got to know him and realized that he is the perfect guy to have out there representing the brand. He’s a big family guy, humble and low-key, and he just let’s his game do the talking, all of which we admire. And the guy has got tons of game. He made it into the field at the U.S. Open again this year, so we’re headed out to Shinnecock next week to cheer him on.

BA: Speaking of the Tour, apparel is in an interesting and dynamic place, isn’t it?

AH: Definitely. We think it’s great that there are a number of new brands out there pushing things forward, and it’s not a winner-take-all market. Things are certainly competitive, but brands both within and beyond golf are becoming more niche, which helps customers find the ones that specifically work for them. We don’t really pay a lot of attention to the apparel game on tour specifically, to be honest. We care just as much what’s going on out on the mid-am scene, where a lot of guys who obviously aren’t getting paid choose to wear our stuff simply because they like it better.

BA: Beyond deliberate growth, what’s on the horizon for H&B?

AH: We’re now stocking more than 150 pro shops around the country (and abroad – Sunningdale in England and Toronto Golf Club up in Canada have picked up the line), so we are excited about that momentum. For 2019, we’ve got big plans to expand our apparel collection, with a broader range of shirt fabrics and styles, some very cool layering pieces, and more premium accessories such as belts, hats, and bags. As designers, we really feel like we’re just getting started.

BA: Thanks, Alex.

You can find Holderness & Bourne on the web here.

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