Connect with us

Instruction

Use visualization, imagery like many of golf’s greats

Published

on

The saying “success leaves clues” is as true in golf as it is in all other sports.

Golf’s all-time greats and top athletes from other sports have used similar universal principles to reach their full athletic prowess. There are multiple fundamentals shared by the best of the best.

One of my favorite and most powerful traits shared by top athletes is their ability to use pictures and mental images. This amazing ability to control images is called visualization and imagery by sport psychologists.

Most of the greatest golfers from history have used some form of visualization and mental imagery, including golf’s all time leading major champion Jack Nicklaus.

“I never hit a shot, not even in practice, without having a very sharp, in-focus picture of it in my head,” Nicklaus said. “First, I see the ball where I want it to finish, nice and white and sitting up high on the bright green grass. Then, the scene quickly changes, and I see the ball going there: its path, trajectory, and shape, even its behavior on landing. Then there is a sort of fade-out, and the next scene shows me making the kind of swing that will turn the previous images into reality.”

Nicklaus has even affirmed that 50 percent of success in golf is a golfer’s mental picture. Growing up, Tiger Woods said one of his most important thoughts was where he wanted to ball to go. Meaning, he had a clear picture of the shot he wanted to hit. Similar to Nicklaus and Tiger, greats from other sports like hockey’s all-time leading scorer Wayne Gretzky have admitted to using pictures as a major part of his success.

“We taped a lot of famous pictures on the locker-room doors,” Gretzky says. “Bobby Orr, Felix Potvin, John Beliveau, all holding the Stanley Cup. We’d stand back and look at them and envision ourselves doing it. I really believe if you visualize yourself doing something, you can make that image come true … I must have rehearsed it 10,000 times. And when it came true it was like an eclectic jolt went up my spine.”

Whether you’re aspiring to be a top junior, college player, professional, or weekend warrior, one thing is for sure — visualization and imagery are a critical component to a golfer’s performance and mental game.

This is a major reason why all the students I work with in our junior golf program and our Post Graduate Program at the Gary Gilchrist Golf Academy are trained to use visualization and imagery during our mental coaching sessions.

Visualization isn’t a mental strategy limited to professionals and top junior golfers. Science has demonstrated that mental imagery is beneficial to all golfers, regardless of age or current ability level.

Sport psychology research has found a strong link between performance and the visual pictures golfers use in a new line of exciting research called Functional Equivalence. If this term sounds confusing, don’t worry. The idea behind it is simple. All it means is that the same areas of the brain are activated when imagining a movement as actually making that movement. Meaning, if you were to imagine making a golf swing, many of the same areas within your brain are activated as when actually making the golf swing. In essence, the brain acts the same way when imagining a movement as when actually making the movement.

So why is this important? How can this help you? Simply put, every time you imagine something your brain is mentally practicing to make that image come true. This means that your imagination can act as an amazing tool in developing and training your mental game and golf game.

Since everything you imagine sends a signal to your brain, it means that not only are good images sent to your brain, but so are the negative images.

So be careful of the images and pictures you choose to focus on. You must learn to gain control of your imagination and not let your imagination control you. The golfers who are most happy and achieve the most success in golf have learned to master their imagination and send more positive pictures to their brain then negative ones.

Your Reaction?
  • 6
  • LEGIT6
  • WOW2
  • LOL2
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP1
  • OB2
  • SHANK3

Dan Vosgerichian Ph.D. is owner of Elite Performance Solutions. Dr. Dan earned his doctorate in Sport Psychology from Florida State University and has more than 10 years of experience working with golfers to maximize their mental game. His clients have included golfers from The PGA Tour, LPGA Tour, Web.com Tour, PGA Latin America, as well as some of the top junior and collegiate players in the country. Dr. Dan has experience training elite golfers on every aspect of the game. He served as The Director of Mental Training at Gary Gilchrist Golf Academy, as well as a Mental Game Coach for Nike Golf Schools. He’s also worked as an instructor at The PGA Tour Golf Academy and assistant golf coach at Springfield College. Dan's worked as a professional caddie at TPC Sawgrass, Home of The Players Championship, as well as an assistant to Florida State University's PGA Professional Golf Management Program.

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Pingback: Do These 6 Things Before Every Shot

  2. Kelly

    Oct 22, 2013 at 12:00 am

    There are two ways to do your visualization. One is seeing the pictures from your own eyes. This gives the images an emotional reference. The other way is to picture the scene with your body in it. This is more objective. Which is better? It depends on the result you are looking for. For golf shots, I have found it best when people picture their body rather than through their own eyes. When visualizing a final result like holding a trophy, it may be better to use a more emotional tool.

  3. naflack

    Oct 14, 2013 at 12:45 am

    i didnt know jack was so focused…
    i know for my game if dont focus on the target and the ball flight ill hit quality shots that miss the mark.

    • craig@tourimpactgolf.com

      Oct 17, 2013 at 8:43 am

      Oh yes… Jacks focus was such that he claimed he never took a swing without a purpose. Shame on me for the way i can just beat balls at times.

Leave a Reply

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Instruction

Stickney: Sit on it (for a better backswing)

Published

on

As we know golf, is a very tough sport and one that involves many moving pieces. Whenever something overreacts or moves too much on the way back, you end up playing catch-up on the way down. One of my favorite things to watch is how the head moves or doesn’t move on the backswing. Sure, you can have some movement, but you can’t have too much or you put yourself behind the eight ball.

I have charted the head position of a tour player at address and we can see that this is a very normal set up position. It is one that looks positioned to do great things.

However, en route to the top, you can see that this player has put himself into a position where his rear knee straightened too rapidly off the start of his backswing. When this occurs the pelvis “runs out from under” the upper body on the backswing the hips will react and begin to slant downward. (You can see a -10 degree tilt versus 3 degrees the opposite way at address for you number people.)

This causes the head to move out in front of where it was at address. This is not a bad position for the irons but for a driver we have a pending issue. If you don’t make a compensation from here then the player will have an angle of attack that is too much downward through impact with their driver.

As the player moves into his transition, the hips have leveled as the rear shoulder lowers the club into delivery but the head and pelvis are still too far out in front of the ball. The only thing you can do from here is fire the lead side upwards and hope that your head falls back into the correct position. If so, you will have the correct angle of attack, if not, you will chop down on the ball causing your launch conditions to be faulty.

And as we see here that this is precisely what this player did at the very last minute…not the easiest way to swing the club but it is functional IF you make the right correction. So, now that you understand how simple things like the action of the lower body can cause your head to move and your angle of attack to become faulty, what is the secret to controlling your lower body?


Just “sit” on the rear knee flex slightly longer during the backswing as you see here. This will slow down the tilting of the pelvis on backswing and thus your head will stay more in position en route to the top.

Personally, I teach both flexion and extension of the rear knee to the top, depending on what the player is wanting to do, so it really does not matter. However, what does matter is the rate at which it begins to straighten for those of you who do allow it to lengthen. I try to make most of my students hold the most of their address flex until the club moves between belt and chest high, any sooner and you risk the faulty pivot we saw above.

Therefore, take it from me and “sit on it” slightly longer for more quiet head motions as well as a more balanced backswing—your angle of attack will thank you!

Your Reaction?
  • 63
  • LEGIT7
  • WOW2
  • LOL4
  • IDHT2
  • FLOP7
  • OB6
  • SHANK15

Continue Reading

Instruction

Davies: Training the trail elbow in the golf swing

Published

on

Alistair Davies shares with you how to get the correct trail arm and elbow action in the downswing. He shares some great drills that can be done at the range or at home to help lower your scores.Get the correct training for the trail arm here today!

Your Reaction?
  • 12
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB2
  • SHANK7

Continue Reading

Instruction

The important lessons you can learn from Peter Senior’s golf swing

Published

on

He may not be a household name in the United States, but Australia’s Peter Senior has a swing for the ages. At 60 years old, Senior has 34 worldwide professional wins including the 2015 Australian Masters beating a competitive field with several top-ranked players in the world. Turning professional in 1978, his career has spanned over 40 years.

Senior’s game and swing have stood the test of time, and the longevity of his career should be recognized. Senior formerly worked with Australian instructor Gary Edwin, and the structure to this swing taught to Senior paved the way for a future of consistent, high-quality professional golf.

Having a great golf swing isn’t the only key to becoming a great golfer, one must learn to play the game. However, you can learn a lot from Senior’s swing.

The origin to Senior’s swing lies in his set-up. Senior sets up in what I call his “hitting angles” or a position that mirrors impact.

From this position, Senior is able to simply keep these angles he established at address throughout the swing. This is why the set-up is so critical. The further he deviates from these “hitting angles”, the more he will have to find that impact position with his body in the backswing and downswing. In other words, more movement. The goal of his backswing will be to maintain these original starting angles.

From the picture, Senior has maintained his original body shape that he established at address. From this position, it will be much easier and repeatable to return the club to impact.

Note how his impact position now mirrors his original address position. All his original angles were maintained with a slight bump of the body towards the target. From impact, he can simply fold up his arms as his right side of his body rotates around his left side, keeping the clubface square to the body.

This standing tall finish position with the head following the torso is much easier on the back. His body has come forward and around beautifully, covering the ball for a proper strike.

The beauty of Senior’s swing lies in its simplicity. The changes Senior made to his swing can apply to anyone. Let’s look at two simple drills to make your swing more efficient and powerful.

“To a large extent, my backswing is a product of my set-up position” – Tiger Woods, Golf Digest 2020

To get into these impact angles simply practice pushing into an impact bag with the head and shaft of the club. Make sure your trail arm is tucked, lowering the trail shoulder as you pressure the bag.

To get the feeling of the proper coil from this set-up position, grab an impact bag and hold the bag in front of you.

From here, swing the bag around you with your arms keeping the top of the bag level. You will feel the trail side of your body move back and the lead side move out, coiling around your spine angle.

The trail glute will also move back and around with this drill, a key move the great Ben Hogan used to pivot his body. To develop an efficient swing and a long, injury-free career, take note of Peter Senior’s key moves.

Your Reaction?
  • 183
  • LEGIT14
  • WOW4
  • LOL1
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP10
  • OB6
  • SHANK21

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending