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Spotted: Nike Covert Tour 2.0 Driver

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Say hello to the Nike Covert Tour 2.0 driver, which landed on the USGA’s List of Conforming Driver heads earlier this week and was being tested by Charl Schwartzel today at the Tour Championship.

Like Nike’s 2013 VR_S Covert and Covert Tour drivers, the Covert Tour 2.0 has Nike’s FlexLoft adapter, which is a clue that the driver is likely headed for retail (unlike the non-adjustable Covert Tour Version 5 and 6 drivers added to the list in recent months).

It’s hard to say from the photos exactly what has changed about the Covert Tour 2.0 other than the new graphics scheme. Nike has swapped the red paint that surrounded last year’s cavity-back area on the driver for white paint, which should further highlight the driver’s main selling point. The cavity section of the driver also appears to be larger than last year’s Covert Tour model, which should further increase the driver’s forgiveness on mishits.

Nike also placed the word “Tour” in large letters in the center of the sole, which will make it easier for consumers to differentiate between the company’s lower-spinning Tour model and Nike’s higher-spinning performance model.

Click here to see what  GolfWRX members are saying about the driver in the forums.

Click here to see what  GolfWRX members are saying about the driver in the forums.

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  1. Pingback: What's in Rory McIlroy's Bag? | Golf Gear Select

  2. Pingback: Rory takes fourth career major in a shootout at Valhalla... » D'Lance GolfD'Lance Golf

  3. Justin

    Nov 1, 2013 at 9:38 pm

    If it has a better sound than the last one then i’ll give it a try. Did not like the high pitch sound of the last VRS Tour

  4. Pingback: New Nike Golf VR_S Covert 2.0 Driver Pics | NG NATION — Nike Golf Fan Blog

  5. KCCO

    Sep 30, 2013 at 7:29 pm

    I actually liked the last covert (tour? Smaller/black face) anyhow, liked the sound and had a low trajectory to my liking, stock shaft wasn’t for me, but was able to play with a blk tie and enjoyed more than any other driver besides D3….but just don’t like the red, and not a hard decision when u put d3 next to it

  6. J Duf

    Sep 23, 2013 at 10:12 am

    Just give up already…

  7. lloyd duffield

    Sep 20, 2013 at 6:41 am

    i think nike has struggled to be taken has a major contender in the golf market but this year with the new gear and signing big names they stepped up big time. but saying that i had the covert tour driver is was great looking bit of kit but it wasnt the best i hit but i blame the crap stock shaft. but i did have there vr pro combo irons and they was one of the best irons ive hit and there putters are good as well. saying all this is good but they cant rely on staff players selling there products they need to stop saying BELIEAVE IN THE ATHLETE and start saying BELIVE IN THE PRODUCTS because how long has Tiger Woods got left and will Rory ever win again ? wot im saying is when Tigers gone and Rory stumps to 100+ wots going to happen to Nike Golf ? after all this im still a fan and wish them all the best

  8. Pastorcam201

    Sep 19, 2013 at 9:38 pm

    I love my covert tour driver it’s a bomb I can draw or fade the ball I’ve never been able to do that before plus my neighbor through out his pulled real deal diamana ahina shaft I dumpster dove and put it in my covert and it really came alive

  9. pablo

    Sep 19, 2013 at 8:53 pm

    I live in Arizona and hit callaway razr fit drivers and woods, but when we were on vaca in maui earlier this year, even at very close to sea level and with damp air, the covert rental metal driver and 3 wood produced insane distance and trajectory for me. i drove the green from 290 yards hitting from the forward tees (easier to play with my wife on vaca) and the ball went thru the green. the 3 metal i hit 250 yards on a par 5 second shot. normally i’m 265ish and 220ish. the sound of the driver is not to my liking, but that day i was ripping the skin off the ball!

  10. Jack

    Sep 19, 2013 at 3:44 am

    Yeah, the COR is maxed out. What else can you do other than spin? How much does driver perimeter weighting (a la the SLDR) affect clubface at impact? Good point on that though.

  11. Zach

    Sep 19, 2013 at 1:01 am

    Honestly, I’m done buying woods now.. maybe one hybrid but that’s it. I’ve finally got out of my way and realized there are two types of drivers, low spinning, and high spinning. Everything else with CG and COR are basically the same. It’s about selling points.. No one is gonna say the driver is gonna perform the same, they’re gonna say it’s bigger, faster, stronger. Some in a blue moon will actually perform better, but in most cases they won’t..

  12. Deaus7

    Sep 18, 2013 at 9:57 pm

    I would have to LOVE IT to put it in the bag cause I would have to pay someone to paint the thing black or do it myself. Other than the red it looks pretty sweet.

  13. Steve

    Sep 18, 2013 at 5:24 pm

    I have been playing the Covert Performance driver all summer and I must say it is the BEST CLUB, of any kind, that I’ve ever hit. Im a 1 HDCP and have had the same Matrix TP7 HD shaft in 4 different heads (R11, R11S,Ping Anser and the Covert) 10-15 yds longer than the others and WAY more forgiving.

  14. Guantanemo

    Sep 18, 2013 at 4:57 pm

    I tried out the original Covert Tour, and was really impressed by it. I like how the new version doesn’t have the “Covert” alignment aid on top. I’ll be looking forward to trying it.

  15. gus

    Sep 18, 2013 at 4:41 pm

    The white in the cavity will surely reduce glare when addressing the ball…

    [end of sarcasm]

    • tricky

      Oct 3, 2013 at 8:09 am

      you must be shorter than me, I cannot see the bottom of the club when I tee it up…..

      [end of sarcasm]

  16. Danny

    Sep 18, 2013 at 2:18 pm

    When will we be able to buy the Covert SQ? I thought square heads resulted in straighter drives & more fairways, Nike ditch that?

    • FATZ

      Sep 18, 2013 at 2:58 pm

      Actually, the Cavity was their way or duplicating SQ tech into the round head from what we were told in all ads and readings.

      I am still of the camp which views Nike as being inferior. They had a golden era, but their new stuff is just inferior.

      • Jack

        Sep 19, 2013 at 3:36 am

        When was their golden area? The SQ series?

        • Jack

          Sep 19, 2013 at 3:36 am

          oops meant era

          • Blanco

            Sep 20, 2013 at 1:35 am

            I’m calling fugazi on Fatz.

            Nike makes better or just as good putters, wedges, irons, and FAIRWAYS. ALL OF TODAY’S KIT IS GOOD. It’s what we like the best in terms of look, feel, performance, and we’re all different.

            I’m on a mission to civilize.

  17. Baba Booey

    Sep 18, 2013 at 2:17 pm

    that new paint job is scientifically proven to increase club head speed by 10x – Nike #faster #speed #longer #straighter #mostoftheirPGAprossuckordontplayit

  18. Andrew

    Sep 18, 2013 at 2:11 pm

    Oh yummy…my two favorite colors, red and white…. a frigging strawberry Sunday.

    Hey Cindy, TM has sunk both of those boats under your feet… What’s really interesting is there is a HUGE quantity of Gen 1 product in the pipeline…with no material differentiation. Good luck moving these at full price.

  19. Matt

    Sep 18, 2013 at 12:18 am

    fugly

  20. Billy

    Sep 17, 2013 at 5:25 pm

    Sick!!!

  21. Dave

    Sep 17, 2013 at 10:30 am

    Yay?? pffft…

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Whats in the Bag

Paul Casey’s Winning WITB: 2019 Valspar Championship

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Driver: TaylorMade M4 (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ Limited 70 TX (tipped 1 inch)

3-wood: TaylorMade M1 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ 80 TX Limited (tipped 1.75 inches)

Irons: Mizuno MP-25 (3), Mizuno JPX 919 Hot Metal Pro (4), Mizuno MP-5 (5-PW)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 120 TX

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 (52-08F, 56-10S), Vokey Proto (60)
Shaft: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 120 X

Putter: Scotty Cameron Circle T 350-SSS
Grip: Scotty Cameron Matador

Grips: Golf Pride Z Grip Cord Midsize

Golf Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Mizuno’s Senior Club Engineer, Chris Voshall told us Casey’s somewhat surprising setup in his long irons is simply the product of Casey hitting the windows he wants to with the particular clubs in question.

“It’s all based on the height of the ball flight,” Voshall said. The MP-25 3-iron was more penetrating and better for him off the tee, so he kept it in there.”

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The Artisan Golf putter fitting experience

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There is a certain mystique surrounding Artisan Golf.  In clubhouses and on courses around Texas, the name Artisan is spoken almost as if it’s a local legend. Something unattainable that only the best players in the world get access to.

Did you see so and so is playing artisan wedges? He ordered a putter from them too. He must know somebody who knows somebody. Those Artisan guys are the old Nike club-makers who worked with Tiger and Rory and Reed.

For nearly the first two years of the company’s existence, Artisan didn’t have a website and orders for custom putters and wedges needed to be done via phone or social media. It wasn’t until January of this year that they launched a website in order to better sell their equipment. And now if you want a custom Artisan club, you can get one. But simply getting online and ordering a wedge or putter isn’t the way they want things done.

“Every single person that has bought a putter, I have talked to them one on one,” said John Hatfield, Artisan’s Head Putter Maker.  “It’s important because I want to make sure that we are getting them the best possible build that we can get them. We are never going to be a volume business. We never want to be a volume business. We want to make what we make and have that good relationship with the consumer.”

John Hatfield

When Nike closed its doors for good on the club making business, Artisan opened the following Monday in the very same space. And things ran pretty smoothly on just word of mouth and prior relationships. Hatfield focuses on putters and Mike Taylor is the wedge maker. But in 2018, Patrick Reed won the masters with a pair of Artisan wedges in his bag and people took notice. The company went from 300 Instagram followers to over ten thousand, essentially overnight. Hatfield doesn’t mess with all that, though. He is old-school and just wants to give golfers the best possible equipment to fit their game.

“We wanted to continue doing what we had been doing,” Hatfield said. “We wanted to offer the consumer what the tour player could get when he or she came in to see us. We had seen people on GolfWRX saying “oh man that is cool but we are never going to get it!” and we said you know what, if you’ll pay for it and if you want it, come and get it.”

And make no mistake. These Artisan guys have worked with the best players in the world. And they still do. When you walk into the Artisan facility, one of the first things you see is a big wall full of signatures from some of the greatest players to ever play the game. Tiger Woods, Ben Crenshaw, Rory McIlroy, and a ton more are all on the wall. Even George Strait has been in for a club fitting.

I went to Artisan headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas to start my relationship with Hatfield and Artisan. To this day, the company is still housed in the old Nike building, nicknamed “the Oven,” which comes complete with a practice green, driving range space and a wedge fitting area. I was there for a personal putter fitting. Having worked for Ben Hogan Golf and Nike, Hatfield has been in the club making business for over 30 years. The man is passionate about putters. But when it came to this fitting, I had no idea what I was getting myself into.

The fitting took place outside on Artisan’s practice green. And that is by design.

“We like to fit in the dirt. I don’t understand being indoors on a flat putt,” Hatfield said.  “That’s not natural. When you get outside with undulations and trees. This is real. This is how you play golf. I want to see what you are doing on real greens.”

And when Hatfield says he wants to speak with every person that he makes a putter for, he means it. My fitting took two and a half hours on the practice green, hitting putt after putt with different models and weights. Throughout the process, we made some adjustments on my stroke and the ball’s position in my stance but only minor tweaks. It felt like a putting lesson without completely getting away from what I was comfortable with. Hatfield wasn’t there to change the way I putt. He was there to get to know me so he could build the perfect putter for the way I putt. To Hatfield,  that all starts with look and sound.

“The number one thing is that it has to look good,” he said. “It needs to give you confidence. If you set something down and you don’t like to look at it, how long are you going to play it? Then after that it needs to sound good. That audible sound has to give you good feedback or you aren’t going to play it. The different mill depths can give you the different sounds that you need.”

And throughout the entire process, he didn’t write down a single word. It was all in his head and in his hands. Hatfield would adjust the weights on a putter and hand it to me. While I used it, he would observe the stroke, ask me questions, adjust a different putter and then hand that one to me. Then Repeat. Different lengths of putts, different lines and reads and speeds. For over two hours. We were narrowing down our options and Hatfield was building my putter in his mind. And at the same time, he was giving me tips on how to better put the ball in the hole.

I came to realize that there was probably no one who understood putting better than Hatfield. Sure, there are his equals. But this guy has spent the last 30 years building putters and fitting them for players. He knows what he is doing. And he wants to use his experience to make you a better golfer. He can talk to you and explain things in a way anyone can understand.

At the end of the fitting, we went back inside and filled out the Artisan putter order form with my specs. We picked out a grip that felt good in my hands but also weighed the appropriate weight for my stroke. I ended up going with the 0217 midslant because it fit my eye the best of the four putter models. The “bluebonnet finish” with a sight circle top line also looks phenomenal in person. I was hooked when I saw it. The full custom fitting and build ended up with a $975.00 price tag.

Each artisan putter comes with a serial number that is assigned to that particular customer. That way, Hatfield will always be able to look back and see exactly what was built for you. And if you want to change your grip or head-weights, that’s fine with him but he wants you to call him and let him know so he can update your file. If your putting turns south, Hatfield wants to know why and he wants to fix it. It really is all about the relationships and making you a better golfer.

The putters aren’t cheap but you are getting personal attention and a relationship with the guy who is making your putter when you spend the money. That is worth a ton, in my opinion.

The headcovers are custom as well. When you end up making your putter purchase, an online headcover creating form is sent to the customer so they can customize the color and stitching. The customer’s input is included in every aspect of the putter purchase.

And if you aren’t able to make it to Fort Worth, Texas for a personal fitting with Hatfield, that is perfectly fine. He still wants to spend a considerable amount of time with you on the phone, talking about your game. He even loves it when you send him videos of your putting stroke and the specs on your current putter. If you go somewhere local for a fitting, he wants to know about that too. The more information, the better. Hatfield wants to get to know you. It’s all about the relationships. He gets to know the player in order to build him the perfect putter.

And that is the thing that impressed me most about Artisan Golf. They care about your score. They want you to improve and if you shop with them, they are going above and beyond to put you in the right equipment to improve your game. If that means spending close to three hours on a putting green with you, Hatfield will do it. If that means giving you his cell phone number so you can call him to tell him you want to change the grip on your putter, Hatfield will do it. If that means taking time to watch videos of your putting stroke and then talking to you on the phone to make sure you get exactly the putter you want, Hatfield will do it.

Artisan cares about lowering your score. Plain and simple.

“We are focused on making products and improving your game,” Hatfield said. “We aren’t focused on all that other pizzazz.”

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight: Quick-Up driving range

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Product: Quick-Up driving range

Pitch: Via Quick-Up: “Using our UT-TEC TM rapid hub deployment system and hanging net impact absorption technology, we created the most unique and functional Golf practice net ever…It’s fast easy set-up and convenient storage and mobility make it an ideal anytime/anywhere practice range. In seconds you can easily have your personal driving range. It’s a powerful, functional and sturdy golfer’s practice tool. Practice all Woods, Hybrids, and Irons with a real ball…”

Our take on the Quick-Up driving range

Avid golfers are seemingly always looking for an easy, convenient place to practice. Of course, a full range is ideal, but we don’t always have the time. The Quick-Up Golf Driving Range tries to provide an affordable solution for us junkies out there to get in our daily dose of practice.

The Quick-Up Driving Range definitely fills a need in the marketplace. Its strength is its portability and doing what its name implies: It sets up in moments and can be taken down in nearly as quickly. It comes with some nice extras such as short game targets and a “shank guard.”

Still, if you are looking for a foolproof option – meaning near-zero chance of a ball missing the net and destroying something that shouldn’t be, you should look elsewhere in the marketplace. Even the fairly pricey Quick-Up Deluxe in not very wide at 10 feet. Set it up in your house and you may eventually have some drywall repairs to do.

While its light weight keeps it portable, it doesn’t’ feel as sturdy and durable as we’d like it to be. Outside, stiff winds can blow it around and the manufacturer recommends using the stakes included for safety. And while initial folding is quick, getting it back in the carry bag may be another story.

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