Titleist’s previous lineup of irons irons, the 712 series, included the AP1, AP2, CB and MB irons — four different models that were made with different shapes, styles and materials to fit the needs of a wide range of golfers.

The 714 line features the same models, but they’ve been updated to improve the flight, feel and performance according to Chris McGinley, Titleist’s vice president of marketing.

McGinley said that there was not much Titleist could do to improve its new 714 MB and CB irons — like blades, their small size and solid forged construction only allows subtle tweaks to be made. And even if Titleist could have made them better, some of the company’s staff players would likely resist the changes.

“The only thing our tour players told (us) was ‘Don’t screw them up,’” McGinley said. “They like them the way they are.”

Click here to see what members are saying about the new irons in the forums.

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Above: Titleist’s new 714 MB irons are the company’s latest line of musclebacks. They’re the smallest, most workable irons in the lineup, with the thinnest top lines and the narrowest soles. See photos of the 3 iron through pitching wedge that were being tested by John Merrick at the AT&T National. 

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Above: Like the MB’s, the CB’s are forged from a solid block of 1025 carbon steel. They have a slightly wider, fuller sole than the MB’s, and a shallow cavity that makes the irons more forgiving. See photos of the 3 iron through pitching wedge that were tested by Robert Streb at the AT&T National. 

But Titleist’s new 714 AP1 and AP2 irons are a different story. Since the original AP irons were released in 2008, both have had multi-material, dual-cavity designs that give them much more forgiveness than their sizes indicate. But with every new launch, Titleist has found a way to improve the performance of the AP irons by removing weight from certain parts of the iron structure and replacing it with high-density tungsten.

Marni Ines, the director of iron development for Titleist, wouldn’t discuss the specific technology that went into the new AP irons — with the launch still several months away, company leadership feels that it is too early to spill the beans. But he did provide broader clues on how the new irons have been improved.

One of the ways to make an iron better without making it bigger is to optimize the performance of each club. It’s called a progressive design, and it will give the AP1 and AP2 long irons a higher, softer flight, while the short irons will have more penetrating, controllable trajectory.

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Above: Titleist’s new 714 AP1 irons are Titleist’s most forgiving model. Many of Titleist’s staff players use AP1’s as long iron replacements, which is one of the reason Titleist didn’t want to increase the size of the irons. See photos of the 4 iron through pitching wedge that were being tested by Ben Curtis at the AT&T National. 

Titleist received feedback from surveys that showed golfers liked the size and shape of the 712 AP1 long irons, which are cast from 431 stainless steel, but they felt that the short irons looked clunky. So the short irons were slimmed down in the new version, especially in the address position, to give them a more compact look.

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Above: The AP2 irons have a satin finish on the face to reduce glare, but a chrome finish on the back of the iron that makes the irons stand out in the bag. See photos of the 4 iron through 9 iron that were being tested by Jason Bohn at the AT&T National.

The new AP2 irons, which are forged from the same 1025 carbon steel that Titleist uses for its CB and MB irons, are very similar in size to the old model, but they have wider soles in the long irons to create a higher launch, and narrower soles in the short irons that help with turf interaction and versatility. While they have a similar amount of offset, that offset is better hidden than in previous AP2 models through a hosel blend that makes the space between the hosel and leading edge less apparent.

The construction of the new irons is not the only thing that has changed — like most new irons on the market, some of the lofts have been strengthened as well.

The 7 iron through pitching wedge has been strengthened in the AP1 irons, making the loft of the pitching wedge 44 degrees. Because of the wider gap between the AP1 pitching wedge and Titleist’s Vokey gap wedges, which are 50 and 52 degrees, the company is introducing an AP1 gap wedge that measures 48 degrees.

The AP2’s 6 iron through pitching wedge has been strengthened 1 degree, making the pitching wedge 46 degrees. Both the pitching wedges of the CB and MB irons will remain at 47 degrees for golfers who prefer traditional lofts.

Click here to see what members are saying about the new irons in the forums.

 

Click here to see what members are saying about the new irons in the forums.

 

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109 COMMENTS

  1. While i’m interested in the on going discussion of lofts and their stance in the game- would it be safe to say the shafts play a larger role in consistency versus the head?

    • Incorrect, shaft is a feel indicator, when a club “feels” good the you know your on the button with the shaft. The correct flex will control direction but ultimately the head is where the majority of the performance comes from…..

  2. Ummm…think I read something about a new advancement in club fitting…a loft lie machine. for all you modern loft haters…bend it !!

  3. It’s nice how Titleist doesn’t change much. I would play those AP2’s in a heartbeat. Callaway and TM are getting too gimicky these days. These are for the true purist.

    Never been a fan of their woods however. Distance wise for me I am much longer with Callaway and TM.

  4. I 100 percent agree that strong lofts cause more damage than solutions. My current PW has 45 degrees of loft. I dug out my old Lynx Parallax PW and use it as my gap wedge. Why? Well, the specs on that wedge are the same as today’s gap wedge, 50 degrees of loft and 6 degrees of bounce. New strong loft irons make it hard to take something off of them, or to play knock downs. The center of gravity is so low if you hit it a little high on the iron you have to choices, you hit a hot spot and the ball flies forever, or, it reacts like a sand wedge and goes nowhere. Plus these super strong lofts have lead to shafts with kick points down by the head of the club, again making it harder to hit multiple types of shots. While heel and toe misses are better, I attribute that to more stable heads, this can be done without putting the center of gravity on the sole of the club. I’m not seeing remarkably better scores that the club manufacturers are selling.

  5. I game the AP1 712s. It looks like with the 714s you’re forced to compliment with 3 wedges, something like 52, 56, and 60. That’s because the new W has a loft of 48. So if you want to carry 2 woods or hybrids there’s no room for the 4 iron. I wonder if the golfer will be able to buy a seven piece set of 5 iron through W?

  6. Very clean looking clubs. Something about Titleist bores me though. I guess they are traditional for the purists.

    • Clean, simple and pure is boring………..I like being bored

      Why would Titleist pimp the mb or cb line???

      Thank God for Titleist and Mizuno in a golf world gone bling mad

  7. Um… The AP1 (which are technically GAME IMPROVEMENT) were the only ones that have strengthened lofts………….

    • Um….no. Last paragraph states: “The AP2’s 6 iron through pitching wedge has been strengthened 1 degree, making the pitching wedge 46 degrees.”

  8. the lower cg wont help you on shots around the green only on full shots and you wouldnt pitch with a 9 iron. Hence why I bought my g25 4- gw to play as 3-pw.

  9. If stronger lofts are ruining the game by making us so much longer, why arent we all playing for paychecks like the tour players? Still have to get the ball in the hole boys!

  10. It cracks me up that so many people get all twisted about lofts. Golf courses have gotten longer in the last 20 years so us mortals need all the help we can get. The gap wedge is the new pitching wedge. If you don’t like it you can have all your clubs bent 2 to 4 degrees week so you don’t need a gap wedge. Otherwise just enjoy the low CG and long hitting modern clubs like all the tour players are using! And now for the original topic the 714 line looks awesome titleist!!! But I’ll stick with my 712 mb’s for now and enjoy my 135 yd PW and 230 yd 3 iron :-)

    • well said, everybody worry about their own game, and let everyone else enjoy hitting longer shots. less time hating and more time working on your game.

  11. I don’t care less about the lofts and the great cosmetic upgrade, my Driver is 4 yrs old, my irons 6 yrs old, my 3 wood 4 yrs, the new club in my bag is a 3 hybrid. I still hit the ball further og the T then the guys who bought the new TM and Titleist Drivers, my PW loft is 48 I still play of a 1 or 2 handicap … So all I can say is weldone Titleist , bring out the new clubs so the retail war can go on..

    • I am with you James. I still play with Ping Eye 2’s that I have had for nearly 10 years and apart from some new shafts a while ago they still serve me very well. Having said that I borrowed a set of titliest mb 712 yesterday while on holiday and I have never hit the ball better. First time I have played with blades in years but will certainly investigate buying a set when I get home to blighty

  12. Why does Titleist feel the need to issue “new models” every two years like clock work? Stop being schedule driven and only introduce new models/brands when there’s a significant change in technology vs a “paint job.” I still use my 710 MBs and they work great. Why would I replace them with the 712s…oh wait, the 714s?

    • Because not everyone like the design of 710 and 712. I personally love when new designs/upgrade arrive. The look of 714 is very nice. I would wait for 714 than buying 712 or 710…

        • They dont need to really change the tech too much because, as you mentioned yourself, many people have been pleased with the way they perform despite their looks so they arent going to change too much. If people like you say they work great, why change too much?

          Titleist isnt a company that is going to create new gimmicks every year and i think them releasing new clubs on a two year cycle is better than buying something new from some other companies and having it be “old news” in 6 months.

  13. Titleist has taken classy looking blades and made them way too busy. Looks more like a Taylormade product now. The AP2’s look like knock-off Mizuno JPX 825 Pros. I’ll definitely be sticking with my 712MB’s, at least until the next generation. Hopefully, by then, Titleist will have gotten back to what put them at the head of the class to begin with.

  14. Impressed by the look of the new 714 AP2s. I played the 710s & 712s and I’m looking forward to comparing the 712s to the 712s side by side.

  15. Its to bad no one ever took out a 6 iron blade from 1990 and took trajectory measurements, then took a modern blade and did the same. then this whole discussion about launch angle and loft strengthening could finally end. We could have a trajectory define a number instead of a marketing guy establish a number on the bottom of a club. makes sense to me. i think they’re pretty.

    • You use a club to get a distance, not a height. I don’t need a pw to go 145. I need it to go 125. If I need 210 yards I should hit a 2, but now I hit an easy 4 (or step on a 5). I’d prefer to control the trajectory myself and not have the club do it all for me.

      • Agreed. Clearly jacking up the lofts just makes buying wedges a pain in the butt, and long irons unplayable (consistently) and switching to hybrids. That helps the revenue, but does it help the golfers?